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Full text of "Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society"

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WAVERLY PRESS. INC. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 




YEARBOOK 1953 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 






PRICE ONE DOLLAR 



1953 

FLOWER SHOWS 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 






JANUARY 22 and 23 
Camellia Show 

MARCH 15 to 21 (Mechanics Bldg.) 
Spring Show 

MAY 4 and 5 
Daffodil Show 

MAY 14 and 15 

Tulip Show 

JUNE 18 and 19 
Peonies, Iris and Roses 

AUGUST 17 and 18 
Gladiolus Show 

AUGUST 26 and 27 
Exhibition of the Products of Children 's Gardens 

OCTOBER 7, 8 and 9 
Harvest Show 

NOVEMBER 5, 6, 7 and 8 
Chrysanthemum Show 

(Dates subject to change) 



j 



1953 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 
for 

1952 

and a List of Books added to the Library 



FOREWORD • The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the honor 
to present herewith the 30th number of the Society's Yearbook, with which 
are combined the annual reports for the year 1952. 

Boston, Massachusetts, August 1, 1953 R. A. Van Meter, Chairman 





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Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 
Elected a Trustee, May 4, 1953 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 

President's Address 9 

Report of the Secretary 12 

Results of the Balloting 16 

Report of Exhibitions Committee 18 

Report on Children's Gardens 21 

Report of Prize Committee 23 

Garden Committee Awards 25 

Report of the Library Committee 27 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1952 32 

Special Medal Awards 38 

Report of the Treasurer 43 

Books Added to the Library 46 

Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission 54 

Necrology 55 

Honorary Members 56 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 

Front Cover Illustration: 

Camellia Caleb Cope shown at the 1953 Camellia Show. 

Back Cover Illustration: 

Kurume azalea of rich pink coloring shown at 1953 Annual Meeting by 
Ernest Borowski. Photographs by Paul Genereux. 

3 




Photo: GENEREUX 

Luther A. Breck, Jr., holds the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase presented by- 
President John S. Ames for the most outstanding exhibit in 1952 — a daffodil 
garden at the Spring Show. John Russell of Breck's who staged the exhibit 

stands at the right 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice Presidents 

OLIVER WOLCOTT 
R. A. VAN METER 

Trustees 

John S. Ames* Elmer D. Merrill (1956) 

Ernest Borowski (1956) Mrs. William A. Parker (1954) 

Albert C. Burrage (1954) Mrs. James Perkins (1955) 

Aubrey B. Butler (1955) Harold S. Ross (1956) 

George W. Butterworth (1955) Harold D. Stevenson (1956) 
Stedman Buttrick* R. A. Van Meter* 

Dr. George O. Clark (1955) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1954) 

Walter Hunnewell (1954) Mrs. Edwin S. Webster (1956) 

seth l. kelsey (1954) oliver wolcott* 

Donald Wyman (1955) 

Treasurer 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Assistant Treasurer 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

* Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 

5 




Dr. Donald Wyman 
Elected a Trustee, May 4, 1953 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 1, 1954 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



Executive Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

OLIVER WOLCOTT 
Finance Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

Budget Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 



Membership Committee 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 
GEORGE W. BUTTER WORTH SETH L. KELSEY 

Committee on Exhibitions 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH, Chairman 

MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Committee on Prizes 

ERNEST BOROWSKI, Chairman 
THOMAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 

MILFORD LAWRENCE 
JAMES METHVEN 

Committee on Library 

ALBERT C BURRAGE, Chairman 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 



SETH L. KELSEY 
RAY M. KOON 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 



DR. R. A. VAN METER, Chairman 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK 
ERNEST HOFTYZER 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 



DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 
DR. R. A. VAN METER 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



Committee on Gardens 

OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 



xMRS. JAMES PERKINS 
DR. DONALD WYMAN 



Committee on Building 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 
ERNEST BOROWSKI MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH MRS. JAMES PERKINS 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 



Nominating Committee 
AUBREY BUTLER 



MRS. JAMES PERKINS 
DR. R. A. VAN METER 







Mr. Harold D. Stevenson 
Elected a Trustee, May 4, 1953 



8 



Reports of Officers and Committees 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 4> 1953 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was held 
at Horticultural Hall. Boston., on May 4. 1953, at 3:00 P.M.. with the President. 
Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mr. George Taloumis. 
Miss Lorraine Charron. Miss Betty Kelly and Mrs. Claire Rochefort. 

Mr. Arno H. Xehrling. the Executive Secretary, read the call for the meeting. 
By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous annual meeting was waived. 
The following addresses and reports were read: 



The President's Address 

We are on the threshold of the 125th Anniversary year of our Society, 
and it is gratifying indeed to look at the record of accomplishment that 
has been ours, and it is equally pleasant to look ahead. The Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society has always been true to its purpose and, each year, 
we broaden our horizon to meet the new challenges which the great field of 
gardening presents. 

We are continuing to meet the increased demands for service to our members 
through our maeazine HORTICULTURE, personal correspondence, tele- 
phone solicitations, and the various activities connected with our flower shows 
and our great library. Publications in various parts of the country and students 
from all over America use our facilities and reprint the material which we pub- 
lish. 

From time to time, we receive gifts and bequests from our members which 
signify their belief in our work. Recently we received a fine portrait of Richard 
M. Saltonstall. President of the Society from 1916 to 1918, painted by H, H. 
Brooks from an oil that was done originally by Frank Benson. This fine portrait 
was presented by his widow. During the past year, we received 120 shares of 
General Electric stock from Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, proceeds to be used for 
purchasing milk for the children who participate in the School Garden Program 
of the City of Boston. The Society has also received the sum of S2.500 from the 
estate of our late member, Mr. Stillman Benway. and it is expected that an 
additional sum of money will accrue from this estate. 

The Trustees who give unselfishly of their time and energy to the activities of 
our Society have worked quietly and efficiently for the advancement of horti- 
culture in its various phases. Often, however, it is only when we lose a member 
of our Board that we become truly aware of our loss. It is with great regret that 
the Board has accepted the resignation of Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby who has served 
our Society as a Trustee for a period of 31 years. She has given generously of 



THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

her wise counsel and has manifested unusual interest in all our activities. It is 
also with regret that the Board accepts the resignation of Ray M. Koon, Head 
of the Waltham Field Station who has devoted himself most faithfully to the 
many tasks assigned him as a member of the Board. During the past year, our 
Vice President, George Lewis, Jr., passed away and his loss will be keenly felt 
with the passing of the years because he was a devoted member of our organiza- 
tion, and active as a Trustee concerned with the responsibilities of our Society. 

As we approach our 125th Anniversary year, I am reminded of the ambitious 
increase in membership which our Executive Secretary, Arno H. Nehrling, and 
his staff are already working hard to achieve. Twenty-five thousand members 
is our goal, and we can reach that goal only by the concerted efforts of all our 
members. May I suggest that each member who is interested in gardening, 
invite a friend to join our great gardening family. 

Several new publications are being planned for the coming year. Our recent 
publication, "Your Guide to a Greener Lawn" by Geoffrey S. Cornish, has 
already passed the 10,000 mark in distribution. This booklet and others 
like it provide an opportunity to help home gardeners solve their problems. 

The numerous details about our activities of the past year will be presented 
to you by our Executive Secretary in his report. However, I must mention our 
Spring Flower Show. It was conducted in a highly, satisfactory manner and 
delighted more than 121,000 visitors with its abundance of color and its 
delightful gardens. Our other eight shows have been equally successful and have 
attracted thousands of gardeners during the past year. 

In closing I wish to express my appreciation to the Trustees for their splendid 
cooperation, to the members of our staff for their loyal devotion and to all who 
have helped the Massachusetts Horticultural Society function successfully for 
the advancement of horticulture. 

John S. Ames 

President 



10 




Photo: CUSHING 



Picturesque Old Summer House in the garden of Mr. and Mrs. Henry D. 
Tudor, Cambridge. Awarded a Gold Medal 



11 



Report of the Secretary 



As Executive Secretary of the Society it becomes my privilege to report on 
^^L our activities for the past year. It has been busy and eventful with never 
a dull moment for members of the staff. There is an ever increasing de- 
mand for horticultural information, especially at this time of year, and also 
during the early fall months. In fact, it is some times difficult to answer promptly 
all the letters we receive from all sections of the country. We answer thousands 
of gardening questions over the telephone, and in addition many people come 
to us at Horticultural Hall for advice on garden problems. This type of service, 
which our Society is dedicated to render, gives the staff a great deal of personal 
satisfaction. 

The financial results we obtained through our 1952 Spring Flower Show 
made it possible to greatly improve the interior of our building. These improve- 
ments included painting, a new floor in our lecture room, the removal of our 
old boilers and the installation of a modern incinerator. We also installed sound- 
proof ceilings in our small exhibition hall and in the basement lecture hall. 
The glass roof over our large exhibition area was thoroughly overhauled and 
repaired. Since Horticultural Hall is over fifty years old, the exterior now re- 
quires some attention. The Building Committee is looking into the matter of 
pointing the brick work and checking the stone ornaments on the front and the 
sides of the building. 

At this meeting I was hoping to report a considerable increase in our member- 
ship. However, we have not yet reached the 15,000 mark which we have been 
striving to attain. There are still thousands of people in the communities of 
this state and beyond its borders who do not realize that they may become 
members. We are now appealing to all our members to help us acquaint garden- 
minded men and women with the services which the Society offers. 

In the course of the year we have received many splendid reports about our 
magazine HORTICULTURE. It is our earnest desire to make our magazine 
the outstanding horticultural publication in America. On January 1, Miss 
Brenda Newton, who did such a splendid job while Mr. Taloumis was in Eu- 
rope, became a member of the staff of HORTICULTURE as an Associate 
Editor. I should also mention that HORTICULTURE will celebrate its 50th 
Anniversary in 1954, which coincides with the 125th Anniversary of the Society. 

The members of the staff have been filling as many outside engagements as 
their busy schedules will permit. They have also tried to keep abreast of the 
times by attending a number of horticultural meetings. In November, Miss 
Brenda Newton and Mr. Richard Husselbee attended the Congress of the 
American Horticultural Council in Philadelphia. Your Executive Secretary 
has been a Director of this organization for a number of years. In December, 
Mr. Daniel J. Foley, our editor, represented the Society at the first national 
Soil Conditioner Conference held in New York City. Miss Dorothy Manks, our 
Librarian, visited the Bailey Hortorium at Cornell University as well as the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture Library to check the catalog collections at 
these institutions. Their collections and ours are the three best in the country, 
and the discussion of mutual problems was helpful. 

12 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

Your Secretary represented the Society at the Thirteenth International 
Horticultural Congress held in London in September. This was the first inter- 
national scientific horticultural congress held since 1938. A vast amount of 
new plant knowledge has become available since that time. Many of the world's 
leading research workers in horticulture were present to give papers on their 
recent experiments. I brought back a complete set of all these reports for our 
library. Soon the proceedings will be available in book form. The offices of the 
Congress were in the old building of the Royal Horticultural Society. When I 
registered I was immediately told that I had been appointed an advisory mem- 
ber of the Proposed International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants. 
This Committee developed into one of the most important subdivisions of 
the Congress and the final outcome of these deliberations were of particular 
interest to American horticulturists. Many of the delegates believed that radical 
changes should not be made until they had been submitted for study. Conse- 
quently, the report of the Committee which was finally adopted contained the 
recommendation to accept provisionally the proposed International Code of 
Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants, also to establish the setting up of an 
International Registration Organization for clearing the names of cultivated 
plants. 

When not busy with committee meetings I attended the lectures on soil 
cultivation, composting, bulbs, cut flowers, plant diseases, vegetable and orna- 
mental plant breeding, and new varieties. 

A splendid Flower Show, staged for members of the Congress in the halls of 
the Royal Horticultural Society, afforded an opportunity to see some excellent 
plant material grown by well known plantsmen in the vicinity of London. 
Dahlias, roses and varieties of our American fall asters, called michaelmas daisies 
in England were superb. 

Last month I represented the Society, as well as the Men's Garden Club of 
Boston, at the Annual Convention in Memphis, Tenn. of the Men's Garden 
Clubs of America. This is a comparatively new organization which is growing 
by leaps and bounds. For many years we were of the opinion that mostly women 
were interested in gardening but the growth of the Men's Garden Clubs has 
convinced us that the trend is changing and an ever increasing number of men 
are ardent gardeners and plant lovers. There were nearly 800 people at the 
Convention, coming from twenty-nine states. Your Secretary distributed surplus 
copies of HORTICULTURE in which application blanks were enclosed in the 
hope of making new friends for the Society and our magazine. At the election 
of officers your Secretary was voted a member of the Board of Directors. It is of 
interest that our Society's former Secretary, Mr. E. I. Farrington, was instru- 
mental in organizing the Men's Garden Club of Boston and served as Secretary 
of the organization for a number of years. 

The various committees appointed by our President have been most helpful 
in conducting the affairs of the Society. The chairman of some of these commit- 
tees will report to you in the course of the afternoon. However, at this time I 

13 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

would like to mention the Winter and Spring series of lectures which were ar- 
ranged by the Committee on Lectures and Publications. For the Winter Series 
we invited our members to "Travel With Us Around the World" and at each 
lecture we had an overflow audience. The subjects and speakers included: 

"Rambles in the Old World" by George Taloumis, a member of our staff 

who had recently returned from a four months trip to Europe. 
"More About Gardens of the British Isles" by Dr. Donald Wyman of the 

Arnold Arboretum. 
"Azaleas and Rhododendrons" by Dr. Clement G. Bowers, America's 

leading authority on these colorful plants. 
"A Botanist in Your Grocery Store" by Dr. Richard A. Howard, Head of 

the Department of Botany at the University of Conn. 

The Spring Series, designed primarily for new home owners, is now in 
progress. The subjects and speakers include: 

"Let's All Plant Vegetables" by Henry Wendler, Jamaica Plain High School 
"Design in the Home Garden" by Brenda E. Newton, Massachusetts 

Horticultural Society 
"Pointers on Home Landscaping" by Seth L. Kelsey, Landscape Architect 
"The Know-How of Pruning" by G. L. Wittrock, New York Botanical 

Garden 
"Stump the Garden Experts" with Mr. Louis Webster, Department of 

Agriculture; Marjorie Mills, Radio Commentator and Columnist; Prof. 

W. D. Whitcomb, Waltham Field Station; Lewis Lipp, Arnold Arboretum 

and Daniel J. Foley, Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

Our Committee on Gardens also had a very busy season. Mr. Wolcott 
and his Committee visited many gardens in various sections of this area. At 
the end of the season the Committee made the following garden awards: 

A Garden Certificate: To the Misses Aimee and Rosamond Lamb, Milton 

A Garden Certificate: To Mr. & Mrs. Ben: P. P. Moseley, Ipswich 

A Bronze Medal: To Rev. & Mrs. Harold G. Arnold, West Roxbury 

A Bronze Medal: To Miss Margaret Cummings, Topsfield 

A Silver Medal: To Mr. & Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich 

A Silver Medal: To Mr. & Mrs. Don S. Greer, Winchester 

A Silver Medal: To Miss Louisa & Mr. Francis W. Hunnewell, Wellesley 

A Gold Medal: To Mr. and Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, Cambridge 

A Gold Medal: To Mrs. George Lewis, Jr., Sherborn. 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase for 1952 was awarded to Breck's of Boston 
for an informal planting of daffodils arranged in a natural setting. The exhibit 
was staged under the expert direction of Mr. John Russell and contained many 
unusual and familiar varieties of daffodils which showed excellent culture. 

The awarding of medals to outstanding horticulturists in the country is a 
privilege afforded to our Society. Our medals are considered among the most 

14 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

important horticultural awards in the world. This year our top award, the 
George Robert White Medal of Honor given for outstanding service to horticul- 
ture, was awarded to Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, professor of botany and di- 
rector of the Genetics Experiment Station at Smith College. Dr. Blakeslee has 
long been considered one of the nation's leading geneticists. For many years he 
was associated with the Carnegie Institution at its Cold Spring Harbor Station 
on Long Island. 

The Jackson Dawson Medal given for skill in the science and practice of 
hybridization was awarded to Arie F. den Boer, superintendent of Water Works 
Park at Des Moines, Iowa. Mr. den Boer is a hybridizer and has developed 
many outstanding crab apple varieties. He is considered the leading authority 
on this interesting group of plants. 

The Thomas Roland Medal for skill in horticulture was awarded to Dr. 
Victor A. Tiedjens, formerly connected with the Waltham Field Station and 
later Director of the Virginia Truck Experiment Station in Norfolk. He is now 
Research and Senior Chemist in charge of liquid fertilizer formulas for one of the 
nation's leading manufacturers. Dr. Tiedjens was one of the pioneers in growing 
plants in chemical solutions, and his books on vegetable culture have attracted 
nation wide attention. 

The Society also awarded several Large Gold Medals for unusual horticul- 
tural achievements. Mr. Fred Edmunds was honored because of his outstanding 
work as Curator of the International Rose Test Garden in Portland, Oregon. 
Mr. Edmunds is known as the dean of amateur rosarians and a nationally 
recognized judge of new roses. The rose garden in Portland, developed under 
his direction, is considered the finest of its kind in the country. The Society 
also recognized Mrs. Bessie Raymond Buxton of Peabody with a Large Gold 
Medal. Mrs. Buxton is an authority on begonias, in fact, she is probably the 
leading authority in this country for her knowledge of this interesting genus. 
Several years ago Mrs. Buxton presented the Society with a list of cultivated 
begonias and their introducers, which required more than ten years of tracing 
and verifying of over 10,000 species and varieties. Mrs. Buxton is also well 
known as a lecturer and served as first corresponding secretary of both the 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts and the National Council of State 
Garden Clubs. 

The Albert Cameron Burrage Porch Fund Committee, the scope of which 
was widened at a meeting of the Board of Trustees last year, was awarded to 
Mrs. Chester N. Greenough of Belmont for a skillfully designed terrace which 
overlooks a garden planted with flowering shrubs, trees and roses, to provide 
a vista of year-round beauty. 

As Mr. Ames has already told you, the Society will celebrate its 125th Anni- 
versary in 1954. We are the largest and the oldest incorporated horticultural 
Society in the United States. Your Secretary and all the members of the staff 
feel that this event should be commemorated in a fitting manner. We would 

15 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

like to publicize the fact all over the United States that we are 125 years old. 
I have already stated that our magazine HORTICULTURE will be 50 
years old next year. By tying the two events together, we feel that this is a 
splendid opportunity for publicizing the Society and our magazine. 

It should serve as an additional stimulus to build up our membership, and 
we are optimistic enough to feel that with the help of our members we might 
increase our membership materially. This would give us additional prestige 
and more revenue and an opportunity to widen the scope of our service to our 
members. It has also been suggested that we carry on a drive to raise $125,000 
to add to our Greater Endowment Fund. 

Mr. Farrington has kindly consented to bring our History up to date, and 
since he was Secretary of the Society when we celebrated our Centennial and 
is entirely familiar with our activities for the past 30 years, he is indeed well 
qualified to do this for us. Many of the important events that have occurred 
during the past half century will be presented in a special edition of HORTI- 
CULTURE. This edition, we hope, will be a de luxe number, for which we 
think there will be a great demand. The theme for our Spring Flower Show 
will also be tied into our 125th Anniversary Year. We will play up this Anni- 
versary in all our departments and for all this we will need the assistance and 
cooperation of our members. 

I have given you only a brief resume of our many activities and I know you 
will enjoy hearing more about the Society through reports that will now be made 
by chairmen of special committees. 

In closing, I would like to express my appreciation for the wonderful coopera- 
tion I have received from the Officers, Trustees and members of committees. I 
would also like to express my sincere thanks to the members of the staff for their 
loyalty and assistance. I hope that I may continue to enjoy the same support 
and cooperation in the future. 

Arno H. Nehrling 

Executive Secretary 



Results of the Balloting at the Annual Meeting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 67 votes having been cast, and the fol- 
lowing persons were declared elected: 

President: John S. Ames. 

Vice-President: Dr. R. A. Van Meter. 

Trustees: (For three years) Mr. Ernest Borowski, Dr. Elmer D. Merrill, 

Mr. Harold S. Ross, Mr. Harold D. Stevenson and Mrs. Edwin S. 

Webster. (For two years) Dr. Donald Wyman. 

16 




Photo: GENEREUX 



A Glimpse of the Garden of Miss Margaret Cummings, Topsfield. 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 



17 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

After reading the masterful reports submitted the past several years by Dr. 
^ Elmer Merrill, it is with some hesitancy that I am making this report. 

The Exhibitions Committee has met this past year seven times, to discuss 
and act upon a full agenda, at each meeting. This committee has an extremely 
good record for attendance, and from my observation, is one committee that 
thoroughly enjoys its work of planning for the various exhibitions. 

We like to feel that we have a small part in the success of these shows along 
with many others, but the major part is due to the Exhibitions Manager. His 
executive ability, careful attention to detail and most important of all, the right 
sort of public relations; all contribute to the high standards which the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society enjoys in these flower shows. 

One example of the means to promote closer cooperation among exhibitors 
is the get-together dinner meeting of all major exhibitors during the summer. 
This gives an opportune time to select spaces, to talk over problems, to offer 
constructive criticism and a chance to iron out any difficulties that might be 
overlooked in the rush of the show season. 

During the year under the direction of the Exhibitions Committee eight 
shows were staged. The only paid shows are the Chrysanthemum show and the 
Spring show, all others are free to the public. 

The Daffodil show had an attendance of 1883. 
The Tulip " " " " " 2542. 

The June " " " " "3723. 

The attendance at this exhibition was much larger this year. In fact 
1689 more attended, due to the Annual Convention of Men's Garden 
Clubs of America. It created a very distinct impression on the visitors. 

The Gladiolus show had an attendance of 2975. 
The Childrens " " " " " 4900. 

The Harvest " " " " " 4379 which was an increase 

of 850 over last year. 
The Chrysanthemum show had an attendance of 5338. 
The Camellia " " " " " 2000. 

The Spring Flower " " " " "121,046. 



A total of 148,786 

This represents a total increase in attendance over the previous year of 2,167. 
It might be interesting to note that there were 152 more people present at the 
Spring Flower Show than last year. In checking with other types of shows held 
just previous to this one, some were off in attendance 10% to 20%, so we 
should feel very gratified with the results. 

Increased premiums, additional exhibit areas in the basement, plus the pre- 
vailing labor and construction costs were the prime factors causing a rise in 

18 




GEXEREUX 



Boxwood Path in the garden of Reverend and Mrs. Harold G. Arnold, 
West Roxburv. Awarded a Bronze Medal 




Photo: CUSHING 



A Vista in the Garden of the Misses Aimee and Rosamond Lamb, Milton. 

Awarded a Garden Certificate 

19 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EXHIBITIONS 

expenses this year. The committee is cognizant of these costs and endeavors to 
check proposed plans and advise means of saving, if possible. Nevertheless 
financially the year was successful and a substantial profit was realized on the 
Spring Flower Show which helps support other activities of the Society. 

We wish to give the proper recognition to all the exhibitors. These flower 
shows are dependent upon each individual, firm or group for their endeavors 
to stage outstanding exhibits. It entails a great deal of thought, plus hard work 
on their part to achieve the desired results. Skill and painstaking care is required 
for proper timing in forcing. These and many other problems are taken in their 
stride, because the fraternity of Flower Show Exhibitors takes pride in their 
profession and their inherent love of Nature. 

Perhaps this is the place to enumerate the duties of the Exhibition Committee. 
How the Flower Shows are planned — why we try to make each one different 
— what the basic reasons are behind all the careful ground work that goes into 
a Horticultural show, especially the Spring Flower Show. 

Planning starts immediately after the close of each spring flower show or 
nearly a year in advance. 

The committee meets as often as is deemed expedient by the chairman. Sug- 
gestions for the betterment of the shows, new ideas to promote interest, criti- 
cisms for or against — all these are carefully considered. 

A theme for the show based on the main hall is finally agreed upon. 

Plans are then drawn to crystallize these ideas followed by more discussion 
and possible revision. Allowance is made so that each exhibitor has enough 
space to achieve a livable garden area. Effort is also made in the planning to 
strive for mobility in handling crowds. Very often a scale model is constructed 
of the entire main hall. This gives a three dimensional effect which enables 
corrections of any feature not in proper relationship. 

At this point certain areas in the Main Hall are allotted to former prize 
winning exhibitors. 

Variety in design and use of materials is essential to promote and maintain 
the interest of the public. Therefore we try to vary the layout plan each year 
because it gives everyone exhibiting a chance to use imagination and to create 
new effects. 

The basic reasons for flower shows is to bring to all, the Beauty of Nature, 
to give relaxation, to educate by the showing of new and unusual plants in 
arrangements and combinations out of the ordinary. It is also a chance to gain 
information about to help grow plants and to combat plant diseases. 

We believe that the Exhibitions Committee has established something quite 
unique in the Boston Spring Flower Show in having for many years different 
groups of exhibitors cooperate and combine their efforts in the Main Hall, to 
achieve a unity of composition unequalled by other flower shows anywhere in 
the country. 

It is with extreme satisfaction and great pleasure that the Exhibitions Com- 
mittee is privileged to watch a creative image materialize into a living reality. 

Harold D. Stevenson 

Committee of Exhibitions 

20 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

The Children's Show probably came closer to approaching perfection 
than any other Children's Show ever held by the Society. The young 
gardeners and exhibitors — the adult exhibitors of tomorrow — displayed 
both skill in the quality of the products grown and showmanship in the way the 
many exhibits were set up. 

The school garden on the Cummings Estate in Woburn, operated by the 
Boston School Department in cooperation with the Boston Park Department, 
had an outstanding display and many prize-winning individual entries. The 
large exhibit was of such fine quality and so well done that the committee of 
judges not only awarded it first prize in its class but also a Gold Medal, the first 
ever to be awarded at a Children's Show. This recognition was a very fitting 
climax for this garden, after winning one bronze and four silver medals in five 
successive years. "This exhibit could hold its own with professional exhibits in 
any Show," was Ernest Borowski's comment. He was one of the judges and 
chairman of the committee on prizes. Director of Exhibitions, Arno H. Nehrling, 
said "I wish I had that exhibit for the Harvest Show in October." 

The Show had 896 entries in the School and Home Garden Section and 384 
in the 4-H Club Section, making a total of 1,280 individual entries by actual 
count. The tomato classes were the largest, with from 45 to 75 entries, depend- 
ing on the age limit and whether green or ripe. In both the vegetable and flower 
halls there seemed to be just enough material so that each exhibit had sufficient 
space. We may have had a few more entries in past Shows but never a better 
arranged or more colorful Show. 

Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, a member of the Children's Show Committee, who 
has a special interest in the children who participate in the Woburn Garden, 
kindly donated $350.00 for a Milk Fund to be used to purchase milk at lunch 
time for all children attending the garden during the 1952 season. 

The 4-H Club exhibit in the upper hall, under the able direction of Assistant 
State Club Leader, Earle H. Nodine, was well staged. Quality was excellent 
and competition keen. The July drought in eastern Massachusetts apparently 
had no effect on the quantity or quality of the exhibits. 

Speaking for Mr. Daniel W. O'Brien, a member of the Children's Show 
Committee, and now retired as Assistant Director in charge of Gardening in 
the Boston Public Schools, I wish to take this opportunity to thank the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society for its genuine interest and assistance in helping 
to promote the school garden movement. 

Henry G. Wendler 

Supervisor of Gardening — for 

Daniel W. O'Brien 

The Committee on Children's Gardens 

21 




Vistas in the Garden of Mrs. George Lewis, Jr., Sherborn. 
Awarded a Gold Medal 







9i W^B^00§^W^9mMM0s0mi0IS^fi^mM&0f§$m0m^^^^^M 








PhotOS: GENEREUX 



22 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

One of the major activities of this Society is the series of shows put on 
throughout the year; and it is with these shows that the Committee on 
Prizes is primarily concerned. The past year has been an extremely 
busy one, and it seems as though the work is constantly increasing. 

Theoretically, all judging should be completed before the shows are opened 
to the public. However, this is all but impossible. For instance, the Camellia 
Show, which is the smallest of all the shows, takes about three hours to judge. 



Now let us consider the recent Spring Flower Show which covered approxi- 
mately six and one-half acres, or over 150,000 square feet. Your committee 
invited thirty judges to serve in the various classes designated in the schedule, 
and their work had to be completed on Sunday, the opening day. Your com- 
mittee had to review the decisions of all of these judges and study and evaluate 
the exhibits as well. All medal and sweepstake awards must be made on the 
Monday following the opening day of the Show. When you consider that there 
were over 200 entries in the show, it is not difficult to realize the magnitude of 
the task confronting the committee. I often wish that there were some magic 
formula by which to judge exhibits. 

True, we use Scales of Points for judging covering 50 classifications and this 
method has its place. However, you cannot reduce judging to a mathematical 
formula, and I have yet to see any three individuals come up with the same 
answer. 



I would like to pay tribute to the members of this committee for giving so 
freely of their time. They have faithfully and diligently fulfilled the difficult 
tasks assigned to them throughout the year. For them there is no hope of re- 
ward — except in the thought that he would be happy — let him serve. 

The committee is grateful for the moral support of the exhibitors and has at 
all times tried to merit their confidence and respect. No committee can long 
function in an atmosphere of suspicion and distrust. 

Finally the committee appreciates the helpful attitude of the Board of 
Trustees, the unfailing cooperation of our Director, Arno H. Nehrling and his 
capable staff of assistants, and is grateful to the judges who have assisted at the 
major exhibitions of the Society. 

Ernest Borowski, Chairman 
Thomas Milne, Co-Chairman 

Committee on Prizes 

23 




1111111181 



Photo: GENEREUX 

Educational Exhibit of the New England Branch of The American Begonia 

Society showing the geographical distribution of a number of begonias at the 

1952 Harvest Show. Awarded a Silver Medal 



24 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommendation of the 
Committee on Gardens, Oliver Wolcott, chairman. 

The Society s Gold Medal: 

To Mrs. George Lewis, Jr., Sherborn — a place created by her and her late 
husband (a fine horticulturist and a much-missed vice president of this Society) 
which has acquired the beauty of age; an entrance court of great distinction, an 
allee commanding a view up the Charles River, a circular lawn rimmed with 
trees and shrubs, and a garden that," in the autumn, is a pastel of asters and ar- 
temisia. 

The Society s Gold Medal: 

To Mr. and Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, Cambridge — a place whose gardens 
and summer houses perpetuate the classic Federal Age of New England's 
architectural flowering. 

The Society s Silver Medal: 

To Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Candlewood Farm, Ipswich — a terrace 
and green garden of hedges with vistas over rolling open and into woods, never 
forgetting the model vegetable garden from which so many have derived instruc- 
tion and stimulation. 

The Society 's Silver Medal: 

To Mr. and Mrs. Don S. Greer, Winchester — the lawns, the alpine wall, 
the pool and the plantings of shrubs and trees well become the house and give 
to its owners an outlook of great beauty. 

The Society s Silver Medal. 

To Miss Louisa and Mr. Francis W. Hunnewell, Wellesley — lawns sloping 
to a field that rolls between great trees, many well-grown and interesting shrubs, 
and a most attractive wild garden surrounding a pool. 

The Society s Bronze Medal: 

To Reverend and Mrs. Harold G. Arnold, West Roxbury — superb old 
trees and a garden of much charm create an oasis of peace not far from an area 
where the bulldozer has done its worst. 

The Society s Bronze Medal: 

To Miss Margaret Cummings, Topsfield — a house on its elm-shaded terrace 
with an old-fashioned garden, a guest house also with its garden, and a well- 
planted wood path to a view of the Ipswich River. 

25 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 

The Society's Garden Certificate: 

To the Misses Aimee and Rosamond Lamb, Milton — for an old place of 
great dignity, notable for a monumental wisteria and rhododendron, many of 
them of great age. 

The Society's Garden Certificate: 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ben: P. P. Moseley, Ipswich — for their extraordinary 
collection of rhododendron, grown with great skill, which yearly attracts both 
horticultural experts and amateurs of floral beauty. 

The Albert C. Burrage Porch Fund Medal: 

To Mrs. Chester N. Greenough of Belmont for a skillfully-designed terrace 
which overlooks a garden planted with flowering shrubs, trees and roses, to pro- 
vide a vista of year-round beauty. 




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Gladiolus Display of Flying Cloud Farms, New Bedford at the 1952 
Annual Exhibition of the New England Gladiolus Society 

26 



Report of the Library Committee 

This brief report will be the last one that I shall present appertaining to 
the library activities. I have been absent too much in the past year and, 
with advancing years, I am unable to continue active interest in the library 
field. I regret to admit that there has been no meeting of the library committee 
this year, the fault being my own. There is a feeling of frustration on my part 
because unfortunately the expenses continue to increase, it apparently being 
taken for granted that as any new activity be initiated, be it the preparation of 
a simple list of duplicate books offered for sale, or such a major operation as 
recataloguing the entire library, additional employees must be added to the 
payroll. As a matter of fact I very much doubt if there is any institutional library 
in Boston with a comparable number of volumes where the maintenance cost 
per volume, all operations, even remotely approaches that of the library of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society. From what I know about the budgetary 
situation in comparable libraries in the Boston area, New York, Philadelphia 
and elsewhere, the only conclusion I can reach is that our library is overstaffed, 
possibly because an attempt is made to cover too many fields. 

Yet it is admitted that the support of such a library as ours is a legitimate 
activity of the Society, and that the library service is greatly appreciated by 
many members of the organization. That the number of volumes circulated in 
1952 was 5308 (down 335 as compared with 1951), and the number of packages 
of books mailed to out of town members 1664 (down 298 as compared with 
1951) proves this. To maintain a large and important specialized library, I 
believe that every member would agree is one of the really essential services of 
the Society. In the past year 585 volumes were added, the total now being 31,- 
468. The library is by far the largest of its kind maintained by any similar so- 
ciety in America. 

Yet with the recataloguing, which has been in progress for at least ten years, 
presumably approaching completion, in that all but a few of the individual 
volumes are now taken care of, it should be realized that within a year or two 
the total number of volumes will be somewhat reduced. As work is initiated on 
the sets of periodicals, it has wisely, I believe, been decided to eliminate some of 
these such as certain runs appertaining to general farming and other subjects 
which contain no papers on horticulture. Here Mr. Farrington is rendering 
invaluable services as an advisor. It is, indeed, often a very tricky matter to 
decide just what should be retained and what should be eliminated, for no 
matter what the title of the periodical may be there are always historical values 
to be considered. In view of the fact that the unit cost of recataloguing has been 
slightly in excess of $1 .00 per volume, and the recataloguing of the several thou- 
sand sets of periodicals has only recently been commenced, it is believed that 
every effort should be made to cut corners. If possible to do so one can only feel 
that the entire task should be completed within the year even if a speedup be 
required. One suspects that the recataloguing project was rather lightly taken 
up and approved ten or more years ago without full realization of what was 
involved, what the total cost might be and how long the task would be con- 
tinued. 

27 




1953 Spring Show 



Gardening around the year was the appro- 
' priate keynote for a series of little gardens 
planned by the Women's Exhibitions 
Committee under the direction of Mrs. John 
Cunningham. A glimpse of spring, the luxuriance 
of summer, autumn terraces and winter con- 
servatories were the highlights in this section of 
the show staged by more than a dozen garden 
clubs. The consummate skill reflected in the de- 
sign of the unit as a whole, the abundant use of 
color and the wide variety of choice plant ma- 
terial inspired hundreds of visitors to make copi- 
ous notes — a tribute to the creative skill, the 
tireless energy and careful planning of the Wom- 
en's Exhibitions Committee and the garden club 
members who executed the various plots. 



Isiilliili'iipiip 




Golden gardens was the theme of the Society's 82nd Spring Flower Show held 
at Mechanics Building. The golden note was carried out with marked ef- 
fectiveness in the dramatic way in which the acacias, staged by Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert G. Stone, were displayed, as well as the plantings of azaleas and 
perennials by Weston Nurseries which flanked the two long walls. 

The famous collection of Kurume azaleas, loaned by Mr. and Mrs. John S. 
Ames, was used with skill and taste to complete the focal point on the stage which 
was treated as a formal garden, replete with a circular fountain and a background 
of flowering trees. (Staged by Bartlett Gardens.) 




$M 












REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

One other item needs attention. For twenty-five years the half time services 
of an expert repairer of old book bindings has been continued. There are no 
data available as to the total number of bindings repaired, or the total cost of 
materials and the salary involved. Unquestionably the unit cost has been very 
high. It is doubted if any library in Boston maintains such a service on a com- 
parable scale. The normal procedure on old bindings (other than hand tooled 
ones) in other institutions is to discard plain bindings and have the old leather 
ones replaced by sturdy backram. This work has been done for the most part 
on early printed and mostly folio works which are rarely consulted and for the 
most part not circulated. The number of old hand tooled bindings in the library 
is very few, and clearly from the beginning attention should have been confined 
to these. Then this activity could have been closed out long ago. 

We are fortunate that there are several funds in the endowment of the Society, 
income from which is restricted to the purchase of books for the library. Thus 
ample funds are available each year for purchases, but all the other library 
expenses, the chief of which is the payroll, must be provided from the general 
income of the Society. I can only feel that the time has come, in view of the 
general financial situation of the organization, for a judicious reduction in 
general library funds, even if certain activities must be somewhat curtailed or 
perhaps eliminated. 

In general the operations of the library have continued as in past years, 
with slight changes on the emphasis on this or that phase of the multitudinous 
activities which automatically appertain to this very important unit of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society. The library is one of the great assets of 
the Society, being by far the largest and most valuable one in this particular 
field in America. We do face future problems, perhaps a most urgent one being 
additional shelf space. There will be a slight reduction in shelf footage actually 
in use as certain unnecessary sets of periodicals are eliminated, but with some- 
what more than 500 new volumes being added each year this released space will 
be of little avail. One thing is certain, and that is no matter which sets may 
ultimately be eliminated, there will be very little of sales value included. As 
a matter of fact when the last list of duplicate books was prepared in 1951, it 
was considered necessary to take in an extra employee to prepare the slips and 
the final copy of the list. I have not been able to get cost figures, but there is 
reason to believe that the actual returns from sales may not have covered the 
cost of the operation. 

The librarian recommends that provision be made for new shelf space to at 
least ten years growth. This would mean space for at least 5,000 volumes within 
the coming decade, for new and desirable books constantly appear, and dealers 
from time to time offer out of print items that it is most desirable that we acquire. 
As the present shelf footage is rather fully occupied this part of an expansion 
program poses some serious problems. There is, of course, reasonably ample 
floor space available in the unfinished rooms on the third floor of Horticultural 
Hall, but to make such space available for library purposes would involve cer- 
tain rather major operations. 

50 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

While this report may impress some as being rather pessimistic, it should 
not be so interpreted. Year after year, the library has received generous sup- 
port from the Trustees of the Society. Various items of expense have radically 
increased; this applies to all other activities of the organization. Fortunately 
the general increase in the income of the Society has also increased, and we may 
reasonably expect mis to continue. I have merely tried to indicate how and 
where reductions may be made in library expenditures provided this should 
unfortunately become necessary. 

E. D. Merrill. Chairman 
Committee on the Library 




View from the Terrace of Mrs. Chester X. Greenough. Belmont. Awarded 
The Albert C. Burrage Porch Fund Medal for a skillfully-designed terrace 

31 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1952 
The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Breck's, Boston, for the most outstanding exhibit in 1952. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio, for his outstanding work in the field of 
vegetable gardening. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa, for developing outstanding crab apples. 

Albert C Burrage Porch Fund Medal 

Mrs. Chester N. Greenough, Belmont, for a skillfully designed terrace. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Bessie Raymond Buxton, Peabody, for her outstanding work with begonias. 
Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon, for his outstanding work with roses. 
Mrs. George Lewis, Jr., Sherborn, for an estate of unusual charm and beauty. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, Cambridge, for a- garden of unusual charm. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, for a terrace and green garden of 
hedges and a model vegetable garden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don S. Greer, Winchester, for an alpine wall and pool with har- 
monious plantings of shrubs and trees. 

Miss Louisa and Mr. Francis W. Hunnewell, Wellesley, for an estate of unusual 
charm and beauty. 

Bronze Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Rev. and Mrs. Harold G. Arnold, West Roxbury, for superb old trees and a 
garden of much charm and beauty. 

Miss Margaret Cummings, Topsfield, for an elm shaded terrace with an old- 
fashioned garden. 

Garden Certificates of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Misses Aimee and Rosamond Lamb, Milton, for an estate of unusual charm 

and beauty. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben: P. P. Moseley, Ipswich, for their extraordinary collection of 

rhododendrons. 

32 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1952 

Presidents Cup 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a North Shore rock garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 

Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., East Boxford, for an informal garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Breck's, Boston, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

George Holliday Memorial Prize 

George Hewitt, Brookline, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Junior League Garden Club, for a living terrace exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Junior League Garden Club, for a living terrace exhibit at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Prize 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for an exhibit of acacias at the Spring 
Show. 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

F. I. Carter and Sons, Tewksbury, for an exhibit of cacti and succulents at the 
Spring Show. 

The Bulkley Medal of the 
Garden Club of America 

F. I. Carter and Sons, Tewksbury, for an exhibit of cacti and succulents at the 
Spring Show. 

John Taylor Arms Award 

Mrs. Archibald I. Feinberg, Newton, for a flower arrangement at the Spring 
Show. 

Book: "Camellias, Kinds and Culture" 

Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, Norristown, Pennsylvania, for Camellia ma- 
thotiana, best bloom in the Show. 

33 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1952 

Crystal Vases 

First Church of Christ Scientist, Boston, for tulip Marshall Haig, best bloom 

in the Show. 
W. J. McKee, Worcester, for daffodil Ceylon, best bloom in the Show. 

American Orchid Society Trophy 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for a group of orchids at the Spring 
Show. 

New England Gladiolus Society 
3 3RD Anniversary Prize 

An illuminated scroll awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society to 
Frank Cave for gladiolus variety Boise Belle. 

Gold Medals 

Arthur A. Arenius, for the most meritorious exhibit in the Gladiolus Show. 
Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for a display of fruits and 

vegetables. 
Bartlett Gardens, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 
Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for a South Shore Garden at the Spring Show. 
Boston School of Flower Arrangement (Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director), for 

Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations. 
Boston School Garden, Woburn, for the largest and best display of vegetables 

and flowers from a school garden. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 
Breck's, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an exhibit of cacti and succulents at the Spring Show. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a Western Massachusetts landscape at the Spring 

Show. 
The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Samuel B. Kirkwood, 

Chairman), for flower arrangements based on the theme "New England 

Village" at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for a penthouse garden at the Spring 

Show. 
Gardner Museum, for a group of cinerarias at the Spring Show. 
Alexander I. Heimlich, for a North Shore rock garden at the Spring Show. 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Department of Conservation, for part of a typical Massachusetts 

State Park at the Spring Show. 
New York Agricultural Experiment Station, for a display of fruits. 
Richard C. Paine, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an exhibit of acacias at the Spring Show. 

34 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1952 

The H. McK. Twombly Estate (at New York) for the best private exhibit in 
the Show. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

The Weeders (at Philadelphia), for the most outstanding garden in the Show. 

The Women's Exhibitions Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety (Mrs. Henry H. Richards, Chairman), for a series of formal gardens 
at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

Arnold Arboretum, for a group of flowering shrubs. 

Arnold-Fisher Co., for the Rose Havana at the Spring Show. 

Ernest Borowski, for a display of flowering plants. 

Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Breck's, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Breck's, for a lily garden. 

Butler & LTlman, Inc., for a display of camellias. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of rose arrangements at the Spring Show. 

Butterworth's, for a group of orchids. 

William C. Doherty, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Gordon Fisher, for rose seedlings. 

Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

G. Peabody Gardner, for a display of camellias. 

The Merrys, for a display of daffodils. 

Middlesex County Beekeepers Association, for an educational beekeeping dis- 
play at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. William H. Moore (at Manchester), for a display of foliage plants. 

National Association of Gardeners (Newport Branch), for a June-July garden 
at the Spring Show. 

New England Begonia Society, for a group of species begonias. 

New England Rose Society, for an educational exhibit of roses. 

Norumbega Nursery, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, Norristown, Pa., for a display of camellias. 

John Russell, for a display of daffodils. 

John Russell, for a display of Eremurus and Alstroemeria. 

Sim Carnation Co., for a display of carnations at the Spring Show. 

Strawberry Hill, Rhinebeck, N. Y. (at the North American Lily Society Show). 
for the best named hybrid Lilium Testaceum. 

John Thibodeau, for a display of miniature bulbs at the Spring Show. 

University of Massachusetts, Pomology Dept., for a display of apples. 

Wellesley College, Botany Dept., for an informal begonia garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal backyard garden at the Spring Show. 

35 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1952 

Bronze Medals 

Mrs. Theodore Brown, for a display of camellias. 

Florence Nightingale School Garden, Dorchester, for a display of vegetables. 

The Greenlaws, for a display of new and rare begonias. 

Jamaica Plain High School, Agricultural Dept., for an informal garden at the 

Spring Show. 
John Thibodeau, for a display of botanical tulips and miniature bulbs. 

First Class Certificates 

Broccoli Waltham 29, exhibited by Prof. Robert E. Young. 
Carnation Variegated Littlefield, exhibited by S. Arthur Peterson, Spring Show. 
Grape Alden, exhibited by the New York Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Grape Naples, exhibited by the New York Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Rose Tawny Gold, exhibited by Jackson & Perkins Co. at the Spring Show. 

Awards of Merit 

Carnation Barbara Janet, exhibited by Thomas Murray at the Spring Show. 

Carnation Kathleen Ann, exhibited by Blackledge Bros, at the Spring Show. 

Chrysanthemum Mamie Eisenhower, exhibited by S. R. Cummings. 

Chrysanthemum Tacoma, exhibited by Vincent DePetris. 

Gladiolus King Size, exhibited by Champlain View Gardens. 

Gladiolus Sir Walter Raleigh, exhibited by J. P. and C. T. Larus. 

A group of dwarf trees, exhibited by the Arnold Arboretum at the Spring Show. 

Votes of Commendation 

Carnation Peppermint Stick, exhibited by C. Henry Jackson & Son at the 

Spring Show. 
Chrysanthemum Roxann, exhibited by Magnolia Nurseries. 

Cultural Certificates 

Peter Arnott, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

William C. Doherty, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

George Hewitt, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 

George Hewitt, for a display of flowering and foliage plants. 

James Hurley, for begonia plants. 

Stewart Johnson, for an acacia specimen at the Spring Show. 

Sidney Kimpton, for a display of dahlias. 

The Merrys, for a display of house plants. 

Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, for a display of camellias. 

John Russell, for an informal garden featuring daffodils at the Spring Show. 

Ruzicka's Inc., for a sport of the Rose Better Times at the Spring Show. 

John Sullivan, for six pots of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 

John Sullivan, for a group of cinerarias at the Spring Show. 

John Sullivan, for six pots of cyclamen at the Spring Show. 

Theodore T. Wallsten, for a group of Rex begonias. 

Fred Walters, for a group of cypripediums at the Spring Show. 

36 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1952 

Vote of Thanks 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a vase of Cornus kousa. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Coffin, for shell beans. 

John T. Coolidge, for camellia Akebono. 

John T. Coolidge, for camellia Lady Hume's Blush. 

Mrs. E. Fielding, for a single cockscomb. 

First Church of Christ Scientist, for tulip Jessy. 

Thomas Galvin, for an exhibit of dahlias. 

Charles R. Higbee, for seckel pears. 

Charles R. Higbee, for second year seedlings of white sport of sugar pumpkin. 

Jamaica Plain High School, Art Department, group of Flower Show Posters. 

Pauline H. Keehn, for a display of marigolds. 

Mrs. Olaf Nelson, for Epiphyllum, Orchid cactus. 

Mrs. H. B. Newton, for American chestnuts. 

Parker Bros., for seckel pears. 

Robert O. Rubel, Jr., for a display of camellias. 

Armund Sorenson, for an arrangement of dahlias. 

Honorable Mention 

Mrs. Edward Leland, Jr., for an arrangement of floribunda roses. 
Mrs. Edward Leland, Jr., for an arrangement of roses. 
C. Sargent, for an arrangement of roses by men only. 




Estate of Mr. and Mrs. Ben: P. P. Moseley, Ipswich. 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 

37 




Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee 
Awarded George Robert White Medal of Honor 



The George Robert White Medal of Honor was awarded to Dr. Albert 
Francis Blakeslee, professor of botany and director of the Genetics Experi- 
ment Station at Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts. Dr. Blakeslee, 
long considered one of the nation's leading geneticists, pioneered in the use 
of colchicine in his work with the familiar black-eyed susan and the datura. 
For many years he was associated with the Carnegie Institution at its Cold 
Spring Harbor Station on Long Island where he conducted his research 
and experiments in the complex field of genetics. In his popular writings, 
Dr. Blakeslee has presented his vast botanical knowledge with keen, human 
insight, thus interpreting his endeavors for the benefit of the layman 

38 



The JACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 
for skill in the science and practice of 
hybridization and propagation of hardy 
plants was awarded to Arie F. den Boer, 
superintendent of Water Works Park, 
Des Moines, Iowa for his outstanding 
work with hybrid crab apples. 



The THOMAS ROLAND MEDAL for 
skill in hydroponics was awarded to Dr. 
Victor A. Tiedjens of Marion, Ohio, 
former director of the Virginia Truck 
Experiment Station, Norfolk, Virginia, 
and presently Director of Research and 
Senior Chemist in charge of liquid 
fertilizer formulas for one of the nation's 
leading manufacturers. 




Large GOLD MEDAL of the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society was awarded 
to Fred Edmunds, long-time champion 
of the rose, curator of the International 
Rose Test Garden, Portland, Oregon, 
since 1936 and frequent contributor to 
the American Rose Annual. 



Fred Edmunds 




Arie F. den Boer 



Victor A. Tiedjens 



39 







Mrs. Bessie Raymond Buxton 



Photo: BRADFORD BACHRACH 



A Large Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was awarded 
to Mrs. Bessie Raymond Buxton of Peabody, Massachusetts, amateur botanist, 
lecturer and author of books on begonias and house plants. Known throughout 
this country and Europe for her masterful knowledge of begonias, Mrs. Buxton 
recently completed a list of species and varieties of begonias and their introducers, 
a monumental task which required more than 10 years of tracing and verifying 
over 10,000 kinds. In addition, Mrs. Buxton served as first corresponding secre- 
tary of both the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts and the National 

Council of State Garden Clubs 

40 




Wt&WMiM 



Vista in the Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Don S. Greer, Winchester. 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




{left to right) Mrs. Lucien Taylor, Mrs. Paul Cabot, Mrs. John S. Ames 

and Mrs. Charles Cabot gather for presentation of Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

to the Winter Gardeners for a plant room at the 1953 Spring Show 

41 




1951 Conde Nast Publications, Inc. 

Grounds of Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Grounds of Miss Louisa and Mr. Francis W. Hunnewell, Wellesley 
Awarded a Silver Medal 

42 



Report of the Treasurer 



It is a pleasure to be able to report to you that 1952 was a successful year 
financially for your Society, and that the red figures of 1951 were in 1952 
replaced by a handsome set of black figures. Total income reached a new 
high record thanks largely to the exceptionally good results of the 1952 Spring 
Show. Expenses, however, also advanced substantially with repairs and reno- 
vations to our building accounting for a sizeable percentage of the increase. 
Large additional expenses were also undertaken to improve our magazine 
Horticulture and to widen its circulation. 

Expressed in figures, the income account totalled $175,299.67 as against 
$139,005.55 in 1951 — an increase of approximately $36,000.00. Expenses 
came to a total of $171,252.43 as against $155,518.91 in 1951 — an increase of 
about $16,000.00. After final minor adjustments, our net income for 1952 
amounted to $4,407.93 in contrast to a net loss of $16,617.18 in 1951. In other 
words, we did about $21,000.00 better than last year. 

I have mentioned that the 1952 Spring Show was exceptionally successful. 
Our income from investments also increased. If the trustees of your Society 
were mindful only of making a good financial showing, 1952 could have been 
a banner year in the annals of the Society, but we are not operating a business 
venture. Our increased receipts were used in large part to carry out improve- 
ments in our general set-up and to make the Society more useful. 

Expressing my personal sentiments as Treasurer, while I naturally like to see 
black figures at the end of the year, and while I take pride in a satisfactory 
financial showing, I recognize the essential Tightness of the trustees in putting 
a good job done for the members and for the community at large, ahead of the 
problem of whether we break even or not in so doing. 

Looking ahead in 1953, I see a continuation of the rise of our expenses, but 
the Spring Show of 1 953 has been very satisfactory from every point of view, and 
I believe that our investment income should rise somewhat above the 1952 
levels. All in all, our budget estimates suggest a reasonably good year although 
perhaps not quite so good as the year 1952 on which I have reported. 

The complete details of the 1952 financial statement are on file and may be 
examined by anyone who may be interested. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stedman Buttrick, Treasurer 

Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT DECEMBER 31, 1952 

Assets 

Cash In Banks And On Hand. $ 37,331 .34 

Accounts Receivable — "Horticulture" 5,174 . 19 

Accounts receivable $ 5,573 . 25 

Deduct: Estimated losses in collection 399.06 

$ 5,174.19 
43 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Accounts Receivable — Other 436 . 78 

Investments at Book Value 871,794.32 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 3,765.00 

Capital Assets 602,895 . 38 

Real Estate $498,564 . 63 

Improvements and additions to building . . . 57,750 . 28 

Library 46,580.47 



$602,895.38 



Deferred Charges 13,854 . 33 

Spring Show, 1953. $ 4,913.47 

Prepaid Insurance and Expenses 5,602.99 

Plant Buyer's Guide inventory 1,570.62 

Almanac and Lawn Book inventory 1,767.25 



13,854.33 



,535,251.34 



Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities . $ 17,932.77 

Accounts payable $ 16,275 . 87 

Taxes withheld 1,196 . 51 

Accrued commissions — "Horticulture" . . . 279 . 23 

Social Security taxes accrued 181. 16 



17,932.77 



Deferred Income 30 . 00 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 3,810.00 

Principal $ 3,765 . 00 

Unexpended Income . . . 45 . 00 

$ 3,810.00 



Sundry Funds 604,477.43 

Special Uses: Principal $167,920.73 

Unexpended Income 5,029 . 50 

$172,950.23 

General Uses: Principal 431,527.20 

$604,477.43 

Gift held for Special Purpose . 1 ,000 . 00 

Greater Endowment Fund 36,903.46 

Balance, January 1, 1952 ... $ 36,902.46 

Net addition, 1952 1 .00 

$ 36,903.46 
44 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Life Membership Fees 35,056 . 00 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053 . 52 

Show Insurance Fund 53,177 . 93 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 131,453 .75 

Balance, January 1, 1952 $ 70,605 .67 

Add: Net gain on securities sold 60,848.08 

. $131,453.75 

Surplus (Earned) 31,831 .78 

$1,535,251.34 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income 

1952 1951 

Income From Investments $ 55,493 .15 $ 54,230 . 80 

Membership Fees (after member's subscription 

to "Horticulture") 27,494 . 62 23,056 . 1 1 

Rentals 12,354.97 11,494.39 

Spring Show 100,981 .31 64,507.70 

Chrysanthemum Show 7,946.51 7,333.65 

"Horticulture" Loss 27,607.62 78,292.46 

Other Receipts 2,523.75 5,342.66 

$175,299.67 $139,005.55 

Expenditures 

Building Expenses $ 41,236 .83 $ 34,521 . 56 

Library Expenses 16,550 . 82 16,716 . 99 

Office and General Salaries and Expenses 67,466 . 49 57,121 . 94 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 3,772.70 3,662.55 

Awards, Lectures, Medals & Certificates 

Lectures paid from general funds 774.86 396.63 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from gen- 
eral funds 5,542.20 3,523.52 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from 

Spring Show 30,792.00 34,741 .35 

Medals, lectures, etc. paid from restricted funds 1 ,959 . 72 1 ,801 . 80 

Awards at shows paid from restricted funds ... 3,1 56 . 81 3,032 . 57 

$171,252.43 $155,518.91 

Net Income Or Loss, All Funds $ 4,047.24 $ 76,573.36 

Elimination of Expenses included above paid 

from Restricted Funds 7,077.53 6,613.02 

$ 11,124.77 $ 9,900.34 
Elimination of Income included above allocated 

to Restricted Funds 6,716.84 6,716.84 

Net Income or Loss $ 4,407 . 93 $ 76,677 . 78 

45 



Books Added to the Library 

May 7, 1952— May 7, 1953 

HORTICULTURE 

General 
Bush-Brown, L. & J. America's garden book; rev. ed. New York, 1952 
Clark, W. H. Gardening the small place. Boston, 1952 
Craft Publications. The Florida garden guide. St. Petersburg, 1952 
Dallas Garden Club. Planting manual for Dallas gardens; 5th ed. Dallas, Tex., 

1952 
Foret, J. A., Nichols, H. E. & Haber, E. S. Laboratory exercises in horticulture; 

2d ed. Ames, la., 1953 
Goldsmith, M. O. Picture primer of dooryard gardening. Boston, 1952 
Grigson, G. Gardenage; or, The plants of Ninhursaga. London, 1952 
Royal Horticultural Society. Dictionary of gardening, ed. by F. J. Chittenden. 

Oxford, Eng., 1951 
Schubeler, F. C. Die culturpflanzen norwegens. Christiana, 1862 
Smiley, Nixon. Subtropical gardening in Florida. Coral Gables, 1951 
Stieri, E. The home owner's complete outdoor handbook. New York, 1952 
Taylor, G. The Victorian flower garden. London, 1952 
Ticquet, C. E. Successful gardening without soil. London, 1952 

Propagation and pruning 

Hudson, R. L. Sunset's pruning handbook. Menlo Park, Calif., 1952 
King, E. J. Plant propagation; 2d ed. New York, 1952 

U. S. Agricultural Dept. Manual for testing agricultural and vegetable seeds. 
Wash., D. C, 1952 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soils 

Kellogg, C. E. Our garden soils. New York, 1952 

Lyon, T. L. (and others) The nature and properties of soils; 5th ed. New York, 

1952 
Millar, C. E. & Turk, L. M. Fundamentals of soil science; 2d ed. New York, 1951 
Shaw, B. T., ed. Soil physical conditions and plant growth. New York, 1952 
Successful farming. A better living from your soil, ed. by J. Roe; 6th ed. Des 

Moines, la., 1952 
Wallace, T. The diagnosis of mineral deficiencies in plants by visual symptoms; 

2d ed. London, 1951 

Diseases and pests 
Baxter, D. V. Pathology in forest practice; 2d ed. New York, 1952 
Butler, E. J. & Jones, S. G. Plant pathology. London, 1949 
Frear, D. E. H., comp. Pesticide handbook; 1952 ed. State College, Pa., 1952 
Gaul, A. T. The wonderful world of insects. New York, 1953 
Hough, W. S. & Mason, A. F. Spraying, dusting, and fumigating of plants; rev. ed. 

New York, 1951 
Painter, R. H. Insect resistance in crop plants. New York, 1951 
Robbins, W. W., Crafts, A. S. & Raynor, R. N. Weed control; 2d ed. New 

York, 1952 

46 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Robbins, W. W., Bellue, M. K. & Ball, W. S. Weeds of California. Sacramento, 

1952 
Smith, K. M. Recent advances in the study of plant viruses; 2d ed. Phila., 1951 
Society of American Foresters. New England Div. Important tree pests of the 

northeast; 2d ed. Concord, N. H., 1952. 
U. S. Agricultural Dept. Insects; the yearbook of agriculture, 1952. Wash., 

D. C, 1952 
Walker, J. C. Diseases of vegetable crops. New York, 1952 
West, T. F., Hardy, J. E. & Ford, J. H. Chemical control of insects. London, 

1951 
West, T. F. & Campbell, G. A. DDT and newer persistent insecticides. New 

York, 1952 
Zim, H. S. & Cottam, C. Insects, a guide . . . New York, 1951 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Alpine Garden Society and Scottish Rock Garden Club. Report of the second 

international rock garden plant conference. Bedford, Eng., 1951 
Flowers of America, a calendar for engagements. New York, 1953 
Havana. Woman's Club. Flowering plants from Cuban gardens. Havana, 1952 
Hottes, A. C. The book of annuals; 6th ed. New York, 1952 

. The book of trees; 3d ed. New York, 1952 

Hull, H. S. Wild flowers for your garden. New York, 1952 
Jenkins, D. H. Annuals for every garden; rev. ed. New York, 1953 
Melady, J. H. Better flowers for your home garden. New York, 1952 
Phillips, G. A. The rock garden and alpine plants; 2d ed. London, 1951 
Sunset. The portable garden. Menlo Park, Calif., 1952 
Wilson, H. van P. Perennials for every garden. New York, 1953 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Bonstedt, C, ed. Allendorfs kulturpraxis der kalt- und warmhauspflanzen; 5th 

ed. Berlin, 1927 
Gannon, R. Decorating with house plants. New York, 1952 
Graf, A. B. Modern foliage plants. Chicago, 1951 
Grayson, E. C. How to grow better house plants. Copley, O., 1952 
Heath, R. E. Alpine plants under glass. London, 1952 

Monographs 

American Delphinium Society. Delphinium . . . for 1951 and 1952. Rich- 
mond Hill, Ont., 1952 

American Horticultural Society. Azalea handbook. Wash., D. C, 1952 

American Rose Society. American rose annual, 1952. Harrisburg, Pa., 1952 

Bishop, F. The delphinium. London, 1949 

Bowles, E. A. Handbook of crocus and colchicum for gardeners; rev. ed. London, 
1952 

California Fuchsia Society. A to Z on fuchsias; 3d ed. Los Angeles, 1951 

Chappie, F.J. The heather garden. London, 1952 

Chidamian, C. Camellias and common sense. New York, 1952 

Cornish, G. S. Your guide to a greener lawn. Boston, 1952 

Cross, J. E. The book of the geranium. London, 1951 

Davis, B. A. Azaleas, camellias, gardenias; rewritten. Meriden, Miss., 1950 

47 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Fairchild, L. S. The complete book of the gladiolus. New York, 1953 

Geert, A. van. Camellias . . . douze plus rares et plus belles varietes de ce genre. 

New York, 1950 
Gibson, J. L. Carnations for amateurs; 3d ed. London, 1951 
Gloeckner chrysanthemum manual, 1952. New York, 1952 
Goddard, J. H. Early flowering chrysanthemums; 3d ed. New York, 1951 

— . The new chrysanthemum treasury. London, 1951 

Gordon, J. Pageant of the rose. New York, 1953 

Green, G. G. Cacti and succulents. London, 1953 

Howard, Frances. How to grow fuchsias. Menlo Park, Calif., 1953 

Hume, H. H. Azaleas and camellias; rev. ed. New York, 1953 

Kyle, Frank. Chrysanthemums. London, 1952 

McFarland Co., J. H., comp. Modern roses IV. Harrisburg, Pa., 1952 

Macself, A. J. Ferns for garden and greenhouse. London, 1952 

Markham, E. The large & small flowered clematis; 3d ed. New York, 1951 

Melady, J. H. Better lawns for your home. New York, 1952 

Mueller, K. von„ African violet manual. Hastings, Nebr., 1953 

National Rose Society. Roses, a select list and guide to pruning. Croyden 

(Eng.), 1952 
New England Gladiolus Society. The gladiolus, 1952. Boston, 1952 
Noble, Mary. How to grow orchids in Florida. Tallahassee, 1951 
Norris, F. R. Growing roses. Los Angeles, 1949 

Royal Horticultural Society. The daffodil and tulip year book, 1951-52. London, 
1952 

. The daffodil and tulip year book, 1953. London, 1952 

. The lily year book, 1953. London, 1952 

Sanders. Sanders complete list of orchid hybrids for the years 1949, 1950, 1951. 

St. Albans (Eng.), 1952 
Schulz, Peggy. Gloxinias. New York, 1953 

Unwin, C. W. J. Sweet peas, their history, development, culture; 3d ed. Cam- 
bridge (Eng.), 1952 
Wilkie, D. Gentians; rev. ed. London, 1950 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HERBS 

Bartholomew, E. T. & Sinclair, W. B. The lemon fruit. Berkeley, Calif., 1951 

Brooks, R. M. & Olmo, H. P. Register of new fruit and nut varieties, 1920-50. 
Berkeley, Calif., 1952 

Chase, J. L. H. Cloche gardening. London, 1952 

. Commercial cloche gardening. London, 1952 

Delbard, G. Les beaux fruits de France. Paris, 1947 

Florida Mango Forum. Mango studies. Stuart, Fla., 1951 

Fox, H. M. The years in my herb garden. New York, 1953 

Gardner, V. R., Bradford, F. C. & Hooker, H. D., jr. The fundamentals of fruit 
production; 3d ed. New York, 1952 

Great Britain. Agriculture and Fisheries Ministry. Outdoor salad crops; 5th ed. 
London, 1952 

Grubb, N. H. Cherries. London, 1949 

Harris, B. C. Better health with culinary herbs. Boston, 1952 

Hoare, A. H. Fruit culture. London, 1948 

Hyams, E. S. The grape vine in England. London, 1949 

Isbell, C. L. Information on vegetables for students in vegetable gardening. Au- 
burn, Ala., 1951 

48 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Levadoux, L. La selection et l'hybridation chez la vigne. Montpellier (France), 

1951 
Melady, J. H. Better fruits for your home garden. New York, 1952 

. Better vegetables for your home garden. New York, 1952 

Miloradovich, Milo. The home garden book of herbs and spices. New York, 1952 

Oldham, C. H. Vegetables growers' guide. London, 1950 

Rohde, E. S. Uncommon vegetables and fruits; 2d ed. London, 1952 

Royal Horticultural Society. The fruit garden displayed. London, 1951 

AGRICULTURE 

Crowder, D. E. The flying nation, the story of the bees. New York, 1952 

Fussell, G. E. More old English farming books. New York, 1950 

McNall, N. A. An agricultural history of the Genesee Valley, 1790-1860. Phila., 

1952 
Nat'l Federation of Young Farmers' Clubs. A dictionary of agricultural terms; 

English-French, French-English. London, 1950 
Whitehead, S. B. & Shaw, F. R. Honeybees and their management. New 

York, 1951 

NATURAL HISTORY 

Audubon, J. J. The birds of America; descriptive text by W. Vogt. New York, 

1953 
Campbell, S. Nature's messages. New York, 1952 

Hammond, C. S. and Co. Hammond's nature atlas of America. New York, 1952 
Higman, H. W. & Larrison, E. J. Union Bay, the life of a city marsh. Seattle, 

Wash., 1951 
Lemmon, R. S. Our amazing birds. Garden City, N. Y., 1952 
Lincoln, F. C. Migration of birds. Garden City, N. Y., 1952 
Longstreth, T. M. Understanding the weather. New York, 1953 
The scientists look at our world. Phila., 1952 

Shuttlesworth, D. E. Exploring nature with your child. New York, 1952 
Teale, E. W., ed. Green treasury. New York, 1952 

ECONOMICS AND CONSERVATION 

American Orchid Society. Handbook on judging and exhibition. Cambridge 

Mass., 1949 
Brouwer, G. A. The organisation of nature protection in the various countries.. 

Cambridge, Mass., 1938. 
Ekstrom, G. F. & McClelland, J. B. Adult education in vocational agriculture, 

Danville, 111., 1952 
Hellyer, A. G. L., ed. The horticultural exhibitor's manual. London, 1952 
King, Thomson. Water, miracle of nature. New York, 1953 
McConkey, O. M. Conservation in Canada. Toronto, 1952 
Myrick, S. Our daily bread. Danville, 111., 1950 
Williams, J. Fall of the sparrow. New York, 1951 

FINE ARTS 

Downer, M. Discovering design. New York, 1947 

Grant, M. H., comp. Flower painting of the 16th-19th centuries. London, 1952 

Nissen, C. Die botanische buchillustration. Stuttgart, 1951 

Van Huysam, J. The twelve months of flowers. Leigh-on-Sea, Eng., 1950 

49 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

Biddle, D. & Blom, D. Making corsages at home. New York, 1952 

Brooks, M. J. Flower arrangement workbook I. New York, 1953 

Gasebolt, F. W. Button gardens and diminutive arrangements. Berkeley, Calif., 

1952 
Clements, J. More pictures with flowers. London, 1952 
Cyphers, E. H. Flower arrangement at the crossroads. Boston, 1953 
Designer's notebook; 3d ed. Chicago, 1951 
Donna (Texas) Garden Club. Arrangements on parade; 1950 ed. Mission, 1950 

. Arrangements on parade, 1951 ed. Mission, 1951 

Drummond, M. H. Styling corsages with garden flowers. New York, 1953 
Graffam, P. S., ed. Christmas decorations. Chicago, 1949 
Hayes, N. G. Designs to live with. Berkeley, Calif., 1951 

. Landscape flower arrangements. New York, 1953 

. Old wood in new ways. Berkeley, Calif., 1952 

Hill, A. L. Arranging flowers from the roadside, fields and woods. New York, 

1952 
Koehn, A. Japanese classical flower arrangement. Rutland, Vt., 1951 
Marcus, M. F. Period flower arrangement. New York, 1952 
Nishizaka, S. Modern Japanese art of flower arrangement. Rutland, Vt., 1950 
Romanne-James, C. Flowers for the house. London, 1951 
Sprackling, H. Setting your table; rev. ed. New York, 1951 
Spry, C. Winter and spring flowers. London, 1951 

Underwood, R. M. Complete book of dried arrangements. New York, 1952 
Wilson, A. B. Flower arrangement for churches. New York, 1952 
Wilson, H. van P. The flower arrangement calendar for 1953. New York, 1952 
Wood, M. C. Flower arrangement art of Japan. Rutland, Vt., 1951 
Wood, M. S. Flower arrangements judged and point scored. Macon, Ga., 1952 
Young, M. W. Decorating for joyful occasions. Scran ton, Pa., 1952 

BIOGRAPHY 

Milne, L. J. and M. J. Famous naturalists. New York, 1952 
Swem, E. G., ed. Brothers of the spade. Worcester, 1949 
Taylor, G. Some nineteenth century gardeners. London, 1951 

TRAVEL AND PLANT HUNTING 

Cleland, R. G. The Irvine Ranch of Orange County, 1810-1950. San Marino, 

Calif., 1952 
Darwin, C. Journal of researches into the geology and natural history of the various 

countries visited by H. M. S. Beagle; facsim. repr. Waltham, Mass., 1952 
Walker, R. S. Lookout, story of a mountain; 2d ed. Chattanooga, Tenn., 1952 
Ward, F. K. Plant hunter in Manipur. London, 1952 

. The riddle of the Tsangpo Gorges. London, 1926 

Ward, J. K. My hill so strong. London, 1952 

Watkins, J. B. Gardens of the Antilles. Gainesville, Fla., 1952 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Aul, H. B. How to plant your home ground. New York, 1953 

Gardens and gardening; new ser. v. 2: Bulbs for all seasons. London, 1951 

Gardens and gardening; new ser. v. 3: Hardy plants. London, 1952 

50 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Gorham, H. H. Comparison of occidental and oriental flowers and gardens. 

Tokyo, 1938 
Melady, J. H. Better landscaping for your home. New York, 1953 
Rhodes, P. G. Beautify your home grounds. New York, 1952 
Shewell-Cooper, W. E. The royal gardeners, King George VI and his queen. 

London, 1952 
Taylor, Norman. The permanent garden. New York, 1953 
Taylor, R. L. Plants of colonial days. Colonial Williamsburg, 1952 
Thomas, W. B. Gardens. London, 1952 

Plant Materials 

Beilmann, A. P. What tree shall I plant? St. Louis, 1952. 

Eley, C. Twentieth century gardening; 3d ed. London, 1952 

Eliovson, S. Flowering shrubs and trees for South African gardens. Cape Town, 

1951 
Le Seur, A. D. C. Hedges, shelterbelts and screens. London, 1951 
Menninger, E. A. 1953 catalog of flowering tropical trees. Stuart, Fla., 1953 
Taylor, Norman. Color in the garden. New York, 1953; . ., '[ t \ r \ 

BOTANY 

General 

Anderson, E. Plants, man and life. Boston, 1952 

Ashby, H. (and others) German-English botanical terminology. ^London, 1938 

Blackburn, B. Trees & shrubs in eastern North America. New York, 1952 

Clausen, Jens. Stages in the evolution of plant species. Ithaca, N. Y., 1952 

Crawford, D. L. Hawaii's crop parade. Honolulu, 1937 

Darlington, C. D. & Mather, K. Genes, plants and people. Phila., 1950 

Goldschmidt, R. B. Understanding heredity. New York, 1952 

Gowen, J. W., ed. Heterosis. Ames, la., 1952 

Haskell, Gordon. Plant breeders of the future. London, 1 950 

Karsten, M. C. The Old Company's garden at the Cape. Cape Town, 1951 

Lane, F. C. The story of trees. Garden City, N. Y., 1952 

Lawrence, G. H. M. Taxonomy of vascular plants. New York, 1951 

Lawrence, W. J. C. Practical plant breeding; 3d ed. New York, 1952 

Leyel, H. W. Green medicine. London, 1952 

Ossadcha-Janata, N. Herbs used in Ukrainian folk medicine. New York, 1952 

Prevost, J. L. Flowers and fruits ... 12 of his finest flower prints; text by G. 

G. Dunthorne, 1940 
Richards, P. W. The tropical rain forest. Cambridge (Eng.), 1952 
Salisbury, E. Downs and dunes, their plant life. London, 1952 
Schery, R. W. Plants for man. 1952 
Thornton, R. J. Temple of flora; the work described by G. Grigson. London, 

1951 
Vavilov, N. I. The origin, variation, immunity and breeding of cultivated plants. 

Waltham, 1950 

Monographs 

Alexopoulos, C. J. Introductory mycology. New York, 1952 
Blasdale, W. C. Cyclamen persicum. Stanford, Calif., 1952 
Canadian nature magazine. Native ferns. Toronto, 1946 
Chapman, V. J. Seaweeds and their uses. London, 1950 

51 



BOORS VDDED 10 mi LIBRARY 

Pa\ is. K S & Sterner. M. 1 . Philippine oivhuls N«V V oik. 1952 
IVlvhanskw T, iVneties and the Origin of s. n i - - ; d ed, N,n« \.'a 

Tnierson. R. A. The genetie relations of plant colors in maire Ith.u .;. \ \ 

1 1\'li;v.r do. A treatise on tulips, tr. In U n .in Ppk. Haarlem, 1951 

1 uekhoiV. C A I Ke siapehae of southern Afriea Gape I 0> .-. I 9 - I 

MeMmn. U V Studies in the genus Oiplaens serophnla. . . . i 1 anenstci . 

t\i . L951 
Maxwell. Ac" 1 ilies in their homes. I ondon. 1 • 

aerlean.K \ Jaekson. U A t\ Mushrooms oi eastern i x ,.m.ul a and the I r... | 

States Montreal. 1951 
Redoute. P, ]. Ghois des phis beliefs roses; (IOU> S& r.ins. L951 
v . \ er, T. ). North Amei iean enp fungi, \ 2 Inoperenlates New \oik. . 

. « — / ". & 

: ; .;un, T 1 . DeClduOUS forests of eastern North Aineriea. Thila.. 1950 
Clements. l\ S, Fitters oi mountains and plains, vied New York, 1°\ 
(.Reason, H. A The new Button and Brown illustrated hoi a of the northeast-.--, v. 

I "intod States and adiaeent Canada New York, L952 
dunm. W r The shrubs of Trnns\ Kama Uarrishnrg. 1951 
Jepson. W. 1 The silva of California. Berkeley, 1910 

I emmon. R S The best lo\od trees of Amei u a Garden City, I"s > 
U\ lander. Q\]. Trees and trails Vw York, 1952 
Prattie. D, C N A natural history oi western trees Boston. 1953 
Peters, G, H. I he trees of I on*; Island. I'arimn^hile. N Y*, 1953 
Tistoriiis, Anna. What wild how er is it ' N^> York, 1950 
Piatt, R. H. American trees New York, 1952 
Sin der. E Florida trees; 2d ed. Sambel. 1952 
/nn. H. S. Trees, a tmidc . . New York, 

■ — Other <ouni-. 

Baker. R. St. TV Tanions trees. London. 1952 

Clapham. A. R . Tntm. T G, v\ Warburg, T T. Tloi a of the British Isles. Cam-. 

bridge, Bag,, 1952 

Qodd, 1 T. \V. Trees and shrubs of the Krnger National Tark Tretona. 1951 

Kraemer. ]. U. Trees of the western Bardic region West 1 \. ..>-. bid.. 1951 

Neal. M. C, In gardens Of Hawaii. Honolulu. I°> 

Skene, MacGregor, A. flower book, London, 1952 

Thompson. R. G, A dictionary o\ Assyrian botany. 1 ondon. 1949 

ESSAYS .\\n POE TRY 

(."ollis. J. S. Triumph of the tree. London, 195< 

Qorrevon, H, Fleurs et montagnes, Geneve, ' 
Fitzgerald, H, Phe home farm, New York, i v,,> 

Moldenke. H. N. \ A 1 . Tlants of the Bible Waltham. 1952 
Sitwell. T The book of the hower. loud . 195 ! 

CHI1 DREN>S VOOK> 

Adrian. M, Hone\ -bee Ne> York, 1952 

. Garden spider, New York, 1951 
Beauchamp, Vs i . Crampton, G and Gray, W, s. Guidebook foi Ho^ do w« 
know? Chicago, L< 

Science stories; bk I & V New York, 19M 

52 



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.,,,'U, ',/ \ii.,,„ '.,,,■■, eompteu li t of orchid hybrid* foi tfa ..■■•"•■. 1949 

ndr< i [/art de« jardifl 

[••■•' w y w. A piidie »'/ »>.' '!•••■' I platsi "..." ','.f, in th< Huntington Botanical 

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m< ,i' afi Rc«m ' '■ U ' I Ant' i ' ati re • annual^ 1717. 

,.ni< /iff ^ Iflfdi " '"-'i- log 
-,',i-' '.i < f 'iif i' and [''" •■<•■■■ <"• h\ ■•■><<> 

I- Mr , '.'.' I * • 'I I f,< f,',',l- ',f :.'.,r I' mri^. 

■ ow and Odclli Muihrddma and toad£todl& 

'l .11 ..r,'l '.!., . I' , I't ' • f',r I r, /I, I, :/.,r'l r, 

M m ' I I ) r ' . • ' , r :/ < 
il'J/nff Id B ' B4 fCM "i.il :.'.u 'I r, ,r, f n-l.m'l 

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|fl< '.Ir ( V/ P©f pUUff] f'',rr, ., • m,,' , •'.,,-!' ,, 

53 



Glenny, G. Manual of practical gardening. 

Jekyll, G. Home and garden. 

Lindley, J. Theory of horticulture; 2d Amer. ed. 

Nichols, G. How does your garden grow? 

Robinson, W. Gleanings from French gardens; 2d ed. 

Sieveking, A. F., comp. Gardens ancient and modern. 
Stantial, Mrs. Guy W. 

A list of plants growing without cultivation in Maiden and Medford, Mass. 
Thoron, Mrs. Ward. 

A collection of letters and papers on the early gardens of Massachusetts, gathered 
in preparing the chapter in "Gardens in colony and state." 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

This annual report completes eighty-four years of service of Fruit and 
Flower Mission. 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society has shown a real interest in 
our work by granting the use of our headquarters for twenty-eight years and 
through the Exhibitors we have received all of the flowers, fruit and vegetables 
from eight shows each year. 

The joy that these flowers bring to elderly persons who are living alone and 
those who are in Rest Homes is beyond measure. One flower is a treasure and a 
bouquet is cared for and kept for days. Fresh fruit and vegetables are sent to 
small Rest Homes where they give real zest to the meals. 

During the summer months 834 Hampers of flowers and many cartons of 
vegetables were received from 26 towns. Community Centers gave excellent 
reports of their work at the Hamper Conference. Two new Hamper towns were 
added and one new distributing center was opened. 

The Holiday Basket distribution, made possible by the interest of volunteer 
contributors and workers, was 563 baskets and trays. Each basket and tray 
contained gifts at Christmas and Easter, as well as 100 plants at Easter. 

Fifty of our elderly friends were privileged to enjoy the lovely Spring Flower 
Show. This was made possible by the kind thought of one member of the 
Horticultural Society. The notes of appreciation told of spending the entire 
day there and then "dreaming for days of the lovely picture." 

Our new service at Boston State Hospital provides entertainment and 
refreshments for about sixty-five v/omen patients each month. These patients 
have very few visitors and the outside contact which these parties bring is most 
helpful in creating a real interest for the mentally ill. 

An article in the December issue of Horticulture, titled "Living the Christmas 
Spirit" was beautifully written and we are deeply grateful for the kind thought 
which prompted the comparison of our work with the Spirit of Christmas as it 
should be carried on through the year. This was the spirit in which the first 
seed of Human Kindness was planted eighty-four years ago. 

Since taking over the duties of this office last November, on the resignation 
of Mrs. Perkins, I have been impressed by the helpfulness and courtesies of all 
who are connected with the work of Massachusetts Horticultural Society. It 
has been a real pleasure to work in this environment. Esther L. Camfield 

Executive Secretary 

54 



NECROLOGY 



Miss Mary P. Abbot 
Mr. Robert B. Almond 
Mrs. Mildred Babcock 
Mr. August H. Bernard 
Mrs. Harold V. Bickmore 
Mr. L. Sherrill Bigelow 
Mr. F. G. Brackett 
Mr. John H. Brooks Jr. 
Mrs. William H. Brown 
Mrs. William W. Brown 
Mrs. George A. Browne 
Miss Elizabeth B. Bryant 
Mrs. Nettie E. Bussell 
Mr. William L. Butcher 
Mrs. Curtis Gate 
Mr. R. G. Chamberlain 
Mr. William F. Clapp 
Prof. William R. Cole 
Mr. Arthur- W. Coolidge 
Mrs. Henry D. Cormerais 
Mrs. George L. DeBlois 
Mr. Robert E. Dillon 
Mrs. Edwin Sherrill Dodge 
Mrs. John C. Doherty 
Miss Lillian F. Dustin 
Mr. Daniel E. Eaton 
Mr. Sherman W. Eddy 
Mrs. Dorothy R. Ellis 
Miss Agnes S. Ellison 
Miss Emma Engel 
Mr. E. Wesley Enman 
Dr. Gustavus J. Esselen 



Mrs. Betty K. Farr 
Mrs. L. Carteret Fenno 
Mr. James L. Gebert 
Mrs. Merrick L. Goff 
Mr. John Goodnow 
Mr. William L. Graves 
Miss Helen E. Greenwood 
Miss Josephine Griffith 
Mr. Albert T. Gutheim 
Mr. Henry T. Hatch 
Miss Mary A. Herrick 
Mrs. A. Delano Hiller 
Miss Mildred A. Horne 
Mr. Joseph F. Huban 
Mr. Thornton Jenkins 
Miss Ida B. Jewett 
Mrs. Henry P. Kidder 
Miss Nancy B. Lawrence 
Miss Helen Lehr 
Mr. J. Howard Leman 
Mr. George Lewis Jr. 
Mr. Lemont D. Litchfield 
Mr. Augustus Loring Jr. 
Mrs. Rosamond B. Loring 
Mr. A. K. Losius 
Mrs. Frances E. Lounsbury 
Miss Lucy Lowell 
Mr. H. Alfred Machen 
Mrs. David W. Mann 
Mr. Charles S. Marshall 
Mr. Luke May 
Mr. Edgar McCallum 
55 



Miss Mildred Miller 
Dr. Arthur C. Nason 
Mrs. Eleanor Needham 
Mr. Dana Osgood 
Mr. George S. Parker 
Mrs. Frederick T. Proctor 
Mr. Clarence F. Ray 
Mrs. Franklin F. Raymond 
Mrs. Arthur W. Rayner 
Mr. Frederic J. Rea 
Miss Edith M. Rich 
Capt. Margaret F. Riley 
Mr. Peter B. Robb 
Mrs. Clifford P. Smith 
Mr. S. Warren Sturgis 
Mrs. Gertrude F. Tebbutt 
Mr. Arthur L. Thomas 
Mrs. Leverett S. Tuckerman 
Miss Mabel E. Turner 
Mrs. Carl H. Turnqtjist 
Miss T. H. Twichell 
Mr. Karl B. Ullman 
Mrs. Belle Vaughn 
Mrs. Robert Walcott 
Mrs. Ernest G. Weaver 
Mr. F. Irving Weston 
Mrs. John K. Whittier 
Mr. Frank Wigglesworth 
Mrs. Delano Wight 
Mrs. J. Bertram Williams 
Miss Hattie B. Winter 
Mrs. J. I. Wylde 



Honorary Members 



1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Brownell, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmstead, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. A. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Edward I. Farrington, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Dr. A. F. Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 

1947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Ernest Borowski, Norwood, Massachusetts 
1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 
1948 John L. Russell, Dedham, Massachusetts 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, New York, New York 
1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Tegucigalpa, Honduras 
1950 Kenneth Post, Ithaca, New York 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mary May Binney, Milton, Mass. 

1952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburg, Scotland 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, La Canada, California 
1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Columbus, Ohio 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Conn. 

1952 Mrs. Beatrix Farrand, Bar Harbor, Maine 

1953 Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 
1953 Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 

1953 Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1953 Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon 

1953 Mrs. Bessie Raymond Buxton, Peabody, Massachusetts 

56 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

FOR more than a century the Massachusetts Horticultural Society has 
been favored by the generosity of its members whose patronage has made 
possible an Endowment Fund for carrying on its multitudinous activities for 
the promotion of horticulture in this commonwealth. Furthermore, the Society 
has contributed greatly to the ever-increasing development of horticultural 
influence and achievement throughout the country. It is hoped that the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society will be remembered by those members who wish 
to distribute their funds for public benefaction in the fields of the arts and 
sciences. All bequests are tax-exempt. This Society enjoys an enviable reputa- 
tion for its solid financial condition and its judicious method of handling in- 
vestments. Since expenses for maintenance and activities are ever on the in- 
crease, additional funds are needed to carry on and to extend the services of 
this Societv — "for the advancement of horticulture.'' 5 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, 

the sum of to be used as the Board 

of Trustees may direct for the promotion of horti- 
culture in its various forms and for extending the 
activities of the Society along educational lines. 

Signed 








>. 



■ 



¥ 












:■ : " i 



SOCIETY 



1954 

FLOWER SHOWS 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 






JANUARY 21 and 22 
Camellia Show 

MARCH 14 to 20 (Mechanics Bldg.) 
Spring Show 

MAY 3 and 4 
Daffodil Show 

MAY 10 and 11 
Tulip Show 

JUNE 14 and 15 
Peonies, Iris and Roses 

AUGUST 13 and 14 
Gladiolus Show 

AUGUST 2 5 and 26 
Exhibition of the Products of Children } s Gardens 

OCTOBER 6, 7 and 8 
Harvest Show 

OCTOBER 24 to NOVEMBER 3 
"Flowers in Art and Decoration" 

(Dates subject to change) 



1954 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 
for 

1953 

and a List of Books Added to the Library 



FOREWORD • The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the honor 
to present herewith the 31st number of the Society's Yearbook, with which 
are combined the annual reports for the year 1953. 

Boston, Massachusetts, September 1, 1954 Stedman Buttrick, Chairman 




jifeiliiSlli 

"" 'jg||||l||' 



''"illiililiilP 





Mr. Edward Dane 
Elected a Trustee, May 3, 1954 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 

President's Address • • • • 9 

Report of the Secretary 12 

Results of the Balloting . 17 

Report of Exhibitions Committee 18 

Report on Children's Gardens 21 

Report of Prize Committee 23 

Garden Committee Awards . . 25 

Report of the Library Committee 27 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1952 32 

Report of the Treasurer 42 

Books Added to the Library 46 

Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission 54 

Necrology 55 

Honorary Members 56 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 



Front Cover Illustration 

Seal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society reproduced with 16,000 carpet 
bedding plants by the Boston Park Department under the direction of Henry Buhle. 
Replica of the first Horticultural Hall in background with corner of colonial flower 
market staged by Fishelson the florist. This entire exhibit which occupied the stage 
of Grand Hall at Mechanics Building was executed under the direction of Seth L. 
Kelsey, Kelsey Highlands Nursery. 

Back Cover Illustration 

Garden featuring primroses, cinerarias, jasmine and amaryllis staged under 
the direction of Morris Carter, Director of the Gardner Museum for the Women's 
Exhibitions Committee, as part of "Garden Patterns of Two Centuries." 

The photographs for the 1954 yearbook are the work of Paul E. Genereux 
except where otherwise designated. 




President John S. Ames presents the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase to Mrs. 

Edwin S. Webster for the most outstanding exhibit in 1953 — a garden of 

chrysanthemums staged at the Chrysanthemum Show. The display was 

deemed outstanding for its design, variety and high degree of culture 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice Presidents 

R. A. VAN METER 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Trustees 

John S. Ames* Seth L. Kelsey (1957) 

Ernest Borowski (1956) Mrs. William A. Parker (1957) 

Albert C. Burrage (1957) Mrs. James Perkins (1955) 

Aubrey B. Butler (1955) Harold S. Ross (1956) 

George W.Butterworth (1955) Harold D. Stevenson (1956) 
Stedman Buttrick * R. A. Van Meter * 

Dr. George O. Clark (1955) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1956) 
Edward Dane (1957) Mrs. Edwin S. Webster (1956) 

Walter Hunnewell (1957) Oliver Wolcott* 

Donald Wyman (1955) 

Treasurer 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Assistant Treasurer 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

* Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 

5 




President John S. Ames receives the Farrand Trophy from Vice President 
Oliver Wolcott. This beautiful silver bowl, used as a rotating trophy, was 
awarded this year for the best exhibit of azaleas at the Spring Show 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1955 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



Executive Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Finance Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

Budget Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 



Membership Committee 

SETH L. KELSEY, Chairman 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 



HAROLD S. ROSS 



EDWARD DANE 
SETH L. KELSEY 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



Committee on Exhibitions 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH, Chairman 

MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Committee on Prizes 

ERNEST BOROWSKI, Chairman 
THOMAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 

MILFORD LAWRENCE 
JAMES METHVEN 



BURRAGE, Chairman 

MRS. EDWIN S. 



WEBSTER 



Committee on Library 

ALBERT C. 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK, Chairman 

ERNEST HOFTYZER 
DR. R. A. VAN METER 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 

SETH L. KELSEY 
BUTTERWORTH DR. R. A. VAN METER 

Committee on Gardens 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
GEORGE W. 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 



MRS. JAMES PERKINS 
DR. DONALD WYMAN 



Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 



ALBERT C. 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 



BURRAGE, Chairman 

OLIVER WOLCOTT 



Committee on Building 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 
ERNEST BOROWSKI MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH MRS. JAMES PERKINS 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
HAROLD S. ROSS 



Nominating Committee 



HAROLD D. STEVENSON 
MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 




Edward I. Farrington 
Recipient of the George Robert White Medal of Honor 



8 



Reports of Officers and Committees 
Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 3, 1954 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was held at 
Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 3, 1954, at 3:00 P.M., with the President, 
Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mr. George Taloumis, 
Miss Barbara Dreist, Miss Shirley Holmes and Mrs. Claire Rochefort. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the meet- 
ing. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual Meeting was 
waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 



The President 's Address 



^1/nj his is indeed a significant year in the annals of our Society, since it marks 

I a century and a quarter of service to our membership. This Society was 
-UL founded for the advancement of horticulture in all its various aspects, and 
I am proud to say that it has never deviated from its primary purpose. 

If you were to turn the pages of the History of this Society, you would find 
many illustrious names. Beginning with our first President, General Dearborn, 
many outstanding men in this Commonwealth helped to lay the foundations for 
our Society which today is known as America's largest and most active horti- 
cultural organization. Significant names like those of Joseph Breck, Marshall 
P. Wilder, Francis Parkman, Henry P. Walcott, John Farquhar, William C. 
Endicott, Albert Burrage and Edwin S. Webster, come to mind as I recall the 
accomplishments of their administrations. Mr. H. H. Hunnewell and Prof. 
Charles S. Sargent, although never Presidents, were most valuable Trustees and 
were keenly interested in the welfare of the Society. Prof. Sargent was a Vice 
President and a Trustee for 35 years. These men believed in the principles of 
careful planning, sound financing, and able management. As a result, we have 
inherited a firm foundation on which to operate. With the innovations and 
changes made necessary with the passing of time, we are able to meet the de- 
mands and the challenges which each year presents. Therefore, I feel that we 
can look forward to the future with confidence, because our Society is in good 
hands and our program is broad in its scope and sound in its substance. 

Our capable Board of Trustees continues to give unselfishly of their time and 
energy and our various activities attest to their good work. We are expecting to 
have an unusually interesting observance of our 125th Anniversary in October, 
and the Anniversary Committee, with Mr. Seth L. Kelsey as Chairman, is 
planning a program which I am sure will be most acceptable to all of us. 

It is with regret that the Board has accepted the resignation of Dr. Elmer D. 
Merrill who has served our Society as a Trustee for a period of 16 years. This 
able botanical scholar and administrator has given most generously of his ex- 
perience to the management of our Society. 



THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

Our Executive Secretary, Arno H. Nehrling, and his staff are working val- 
iantly to increase our membership. As I have suggested before, each and every 
member can help our Society to grow by inviting a friend to join this great 
gardening family. 

Our most recent publication is "Winter-Hardy Rhododendrons and Azaleas" 
by Dr. Clement Gray Bowers. It is a most helpful book and I am sure that it will 
be well received by gardeners everywhere. 

Our magazine Horticulture, with its new appearance in bright color, has 
met with the keen approval of our readers, and I am happy to say that the 
number of subscribers is increasing rapidly. 

The multitude of details about our activities of the past year will be presented 
to you by our Executive Secretary in his report. However, I must make special 
mention of our Spring Flower Show. Everyone who attended seems to feel that 
it was one of the most outstanding shows ever staged by this Society and the 
number of visitors increased 5,000 over the number who attended last year. Our 
other eight shows have been equally successful and have attracted thousands of 
visitors throughout the year. 

In closing I wish to express my appreciation to the Trustees for their splendid 
cooperation, to the members of our staff for their loyal devotion and to all who 
have helped the Massachusetts Horticultural Society function successfully for 
the advancement of horticulture. 

John S. Ames 
President 




Cranberry Exhibit, of notable educational value, staged by the National 
Cranberry Association under the direction of Alton Garland at the 1953 
% Harvest Show 



10 




Arno H. Nehrling, Executive Secretary presents a garden certificate to 
Gordon V. Comer, Clerk of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston. 
James Sutherland, Head Gardener of the Christian Science Garden looks on 




Harold S. Ross presents the Jackson Dawson Medal to Francis Meilland, 
noted rose hybridizer of France. President Ames at right 



Report of the Secretary 

As you well know, it is the duty of the Executive Secretary to give an an- 

Z=A nual account of the activities of the Society. However, since this is our 
A. -2X. 125th Anniversary Year, I have been reviewing some of the records of 
the past which were kept with precise detail by many meticulous recorders. 

To Robert L. Emmons, our first Secretary, goes the credit for the origin of 
our flower shows. He started it all by bringing a bouquet of flowers from his 
greenhouses to one of the early meetings. Then, other members followed suit, 
and soon it required a long table to hold the displays. Within a few months the 
first scheduled exhibition was held. 

Ten other enthusiastic horticulturists faithfully performed their secretarial 
duties in the decades that followed. In 1876, Robert Manning took over and to 
him we are grateful for the first history of the Society, which is rich in detail and 
local color as well as a subtle kind of humor. He was succeeded by William P. 
Rich, who served faithfully for twenty years. 

In 1924, Edward I. Farrington came to this Society and greatly broadened 
the scope of its services when he brought us the magazine Horticulture. Mr. 
Farrington gave unsparingly of his time and energy for a quarter of a century, 
and today his enthusiasm and eagerness to help continue to be a refreshing 
source of inspiration to me and my associates. 

With this brief resume, I must declare that it is indeed an honor and a privi- 
lege to have had so illustrious a group of predecessors on which to base my plans 
and activities, and I feel I should not offer you an account of this year's activities 
without first having paid a well-deserved tribute to these devoted men. 

Few people realize what is involved in serving our 14,000 members, more 
than 30,000 subscribers to Horticulture and the public at large. Today gar- 
dening is recognized as the nation's most popular hobby and it has become a 
significant factor in our economy as well. It is estimated that gardeners spend 
over a billion dollars a year for horticultural supplies and services. As a result 
of this avid interest, thousands of questions come to the members of the staff 
not only from New England but from all parts of the country. Consequently, 
our staff is continually absorbed in reading and research using hundreds of 
bulletins and publications from experiment stations and other scientific institu- 
tions to keep abreast of developments in new varieties of plants, new fertilizers, 
insecticides, tools and other equipment, in order to answer questions intelli- 
gently. In short, we are obliged to keep in contact with the ever-changing condi- 
tions in our vast field. 

I am happy to say to the members of our Society that my report to you this 
year is definitely one of progress. Since I last reported we have added 2,553 
new members. However, since this is our 125th Anniversary we hope to have 
many more members before the end of the year. For our Spring Flower Show, 
we prepared a new circular covering the advantages of membership in our 
Society. It has already brought us splendid results. Copies may be obtained in 
any quantity from the office of your Secretary. May I again appeal to all our 
members to help us acquaint garden-minded men and women with the benefits 
which they may derive as members of our Society. 

12 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

The most significant advancement of the Society during the past year oc- 
curred on May 27, 1953. when the Executive Committee voted to add color 
illustrations to our magazine Horticulture. After studying the various meth- 
ods of color reproduction available, offset color lithography was selected as best 
suited to our needs. The contract was awarded to the W. A. Krueger Co., of 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Adding color illustrations doubles the cost of printing 
the magazine. Therefore, to obtain additional revenue, the Committee on Pub- 
lications found it necessary to increase the price of the magazine from $2.50 to 
$3 per year. Although this amount is not sufficient to absorb the increased cost, 
we hope to accomplish it by increasing our circulation as well as the advertising. 
I am happy to say that the response to Horticulture in color is most satis- 
factory. An extensive circulation campaign has brought in approximately 
10,000 new subscribers. In fact, Horticulture is being so well received by 
people who see it in color that the circulation is now increasing by its own mo- 
mentum. Each and every member can help us obtain new subscribers by hand- 
ing on copies to garden minded friends and neighbors. This is the 50th Anni- 
versary year of publication of our magazine Horticulture and the Editors 
are planning a special Anniversary Issue for October. 

The Society has recently published a new book entitled "Winter-Hardy 
Rhododendrons and Azaleas" written by Dr. Clement Gray Bowers, recognized 
as the leading authority on azaleas and rhododendrons in this country. It is 
written especially for amateur gardeners who are interested in this colorful 
group of flowering shrubs. This book is of special interest to me because Dr. 
Bowers was one of my students when I was on the staff of the Department of 
Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture at Cornell University. 

Our booklet "Your Guide to a Greener Lawn," by Geoffrey S. Cornish, is 
still in great demand. This is not surprising because it contains practical in- 
formation not only about making and how to care for lawns but on insects, 
diseases and weed control. 

The "Gardener's Almanac" now in its 11th edition, written for this Society 
by Mr. Edward I. Farrington, our former Secretary, has been completely re- 
vised and brought up to date. To date, more than 150,000 copies have been 
published. This practical little book serves as a reminder of the garden chores 
that we must not overlook if we are to have successful gardens. The various 
parts of the country have been carefully considered so that the book is adaptable 
everywhere. 

This year we are planning to bring the History of the Society up to date by 
publishing a supplementary volume to add to the two volumes now available. 
The manuscript has been prepared by Mr. Edward I. Farrington, largely from 
his own records while he served as Secretary. It will contain abundant pertinent 
information, since it was during this period (1929-1954) that notable progress 
has occurred in the history of the Society. Copies will be available to members 
at cost. 

In the course of the year, the members of the staff have been unusually active. 
Miss Brenda Newton conducted an outstanding television program on station 
WBZ-TV in conjunction with the Massachusetts Department of Education 
during July and August. Both Miss Newton and Mr. George Taloumis attended 

13 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

the Annual Congress of the American Horticultural Council in Philadelphia. 
Mr. Daniel J. Foley and Mr. Taloumis attended an important meeting of the 
Horticultural Council and the New York Flower Show. As usual, the members 
of the staff have been filling as many outside speaking engagements as their 
busy schedules will permit. 

We are well pleased with the results obtained at our recent Spring Flower 
Show. Over 5,000 more people attended the Show than in 1953. As with all 
the projects undertaken by the Society this year, the Show was referred to as the 
125th Anniversary Show of the Society. Although the financial returns were not 
quite as good as in other years, they were considered most satisfactory by the 
Committee on Exhibitions. You will receive additional information on the 
Show from Mr. George W. Butterworth, the Chairman of the Committee on 
Exhibitions. 

In April of last year, the Committee on Building engaged a firm of contractors 
to study the condition of the exterior of Horticultural Hall. Since Horticultural 
Hall was built over fifty years ago, the mortar between the bricks in many por- 
tions of the building was disintegrating, and the ornamental work needed re- 
pair. The cost of this work for the entire building was sizeable so the Committee 
decided to repair only the Massachusetts Avenue and Norway Street sides of the 
building. The Huntington Avenue side will be done this summer, and the rear 
of the building, which is not quite as important, whenever funds are available. 
It has been the privilege of the members of the staff to work closely with the 
members of the various committees in the course of the year. The Chairmen of 
some of these committees will report to you this afternoon. 

Two committees that would otherwise not be heard from deserve considera- 
tion at this time. The first is the Committee on Lectures and Publications. The 
Winter Series was entitled "All The World Is Your Garden". Every lecture 
attracted an overflow audience. This was especially true of the lecture on "Irish 
Homes and Gardens" by Lady Inchiquin of Dromoland Castle, County Clare, 
Ireland. At this lecture we had to turn people away which was very embarassing 
for your Secretary and the members of the staff. The series included : 
"Plants of Australia," by Dr. Harriet Creighton, Wellesley College 
"Follow the Sun," by A. B. Graf, Rutherford, New Jersey 
"Irish Homes and Gardens," by Lady Inchiquin, County Clare, Ireland 
"Plants, Vitamins and Man," by Dr. William J. Robbins, New York Bo- 
tanical Garden 
"Wild Flowers of Paradise Valley," by Eleanor Broadhead, Salem, Mass. 
The Spring Series, covering a number of horticultural subjects from "know- 
ing plants" to "how to grow them in pots", is now in progress and is attracting 
many of our members. The series includes: 

"Learn to Know Your Plants," by Dr. Donald Wyman, Arnold Arboretum 
"Designing the Home Grounds," by Mrs. Samuel Kirkwood, Winchester 
"Controlling Garden Pests," by Prof. W. D. Whitcomb, Waltham Field 

Station 
"Small Fruits for the Home Garden," by Prof. George L. Slate, New York 

Agricultural Experiment Station 
"Growing Plants in Pots," by Mrs. Lucien Taylor, Dover 

14 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

The other Committee is the Special Medals Committee. This Committee is 
entrusted with the responsibility of recommending the various horticultural 
awards of the Society. Our Medals are considered among the most important 
horticultural awards in the world. 

The George Robert White Medal of Honor was awarded this year to Mr. 
Edward I. Farrington of East Weymouth, Mass., who served as Secretary of this 
Society and Editor of Horticulture for twenty-five years. In recommending 
Mr. Farrington, the Committee took into consideration his life-time service as 
an administrator, counselor, editor and author. For his long and distinguished 
service in various horticultural endeavors, covering a period of more than fifty 
years, he was cited for his notable contribution to horticulture. 

The Jackson Dawson Medal was awarded to Francis Meilland, Cap d'An- 
tibes, Alpes-Maritimes, France, for the outstanding varieties of roses which he 
has developed over a period of years. His leading introduction, the magnificent 
rose, "Peace", has become a top favorite over a great part of the world. Al- 
though a comparatively young plant breeder, Mr. Meilland's achievements 
serve as a promising forerunner of great things to come in the rose world. 

The Thomas Roland Medal was awarded to Arnold Davis, Director of the 
Cleveland Garden Center, Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Davis was cited as a distin- 
guished "bellwether" who has developed new interest in and expanded the 
field of horticulture. His able contribution as administrator, lecturer and or- 
ganizer of garden groups has attracted widespread attention throughout the 
United States and particularly in the state of Ohio. 

The Society also awarded two Large Gold Medals. Mr. Joseph J. Lane of 
New York City was awarded this medal because through his work with the dis- 
tinguished magazine House and Garden, he has rendered invaluable service to 
maintain high standards in the field of horticultural advertising, and has be- 
come recognized as a roving ambassador of horticultural good will throughout 
America. 

Prof. Ray M. Koon, Director of the Waltham Field Station of the University 
of Massachusetts was also awarded a Large Gold Medal. Prof. Koon has made 
an outstanding contribution in building and broadening the service rendered 
by the Waltham Field Station. As a newspaper columnist and advisor to many 
professional and amateur groups throughout the state, Prof. Koon has exerted 
conspicuous influence for more efficient gardening practices. In addition, he 
has given unsparingly of his time to promote horticultural activities of per- 
manent value. 

The Albert C. Burrage Porch Fund Prize, which is awarded from time to 
time for a porch, veranda, terrace or other addition to a home overlooking a 
garden, was awarded this year to Mr. and Mrs. William S. Febiger of Man- 
chester, Massachusetts for a beautifully developed terrace. 

It is not often that the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase is awarded to an exhibit 
at the Fall Show, but this year it was awarded to Mrs. Edwin S. Webster for a 
group of chrysanthemums. The exhibit was staged by Mr. Peter Arnott who 
has consistently staged beautiful exhibits at the various shows of the Society 
over a long period of years. This is the second time that the Burrage Gold Vase 
has been awarded to the Webster Family. 

15 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

The new Chairman of the Library Committee, Mr. Albert C. Burrage, spent 
several months making a thorough survey of the library, covering activities, 
objectives and costs, and gave a comprehensive and thought-provoking report 
to the Trustees. As a result, improvements and expansions of the library services 
to the members are being planned, and will be put into effect from time to time. 
A special committee, consisting of Mr. Daniel J. Foley, Mr. John C. Wister, 
and Mr. E. I. Farrington as Chairman, made a careful study of the library col- 
lection of magazine sets and transactions of societies, with recommendations for 
disposing of non-horticultural files. 

I would like to extend an invitation to the many societies affiliated with us to 
make more use of the library facilities. Staff members are always glad to arrange 
special displays of books for meetings and to put the show cases at the disposal of 
any group or to make special exhibits from our own shelves. During the past 
year the Herb Society, the Rock Garden Society and the New England Wild 
Flower Preservation Society were all given such exhibits, and the librarian gave 
talks for the Herb Society and the Massachusetts Orchid Society. 

Before closing my report, I would again like to call your attention to the 
125th Anniversary of the Society and to the fact that we are making every effort 
to make this year another milestone in the annals of the Society. The first event 
of the year at which we recognized our Anniversary was the Spring Show which 
was followed by the 125th Anniversary Lecture Series. The next event on our 
Anniversary schedule is Open House at Horticultural Hall on May 1 and 1 1 . 
Members, friends and the general public are cordially invited to atend. The 
Open House will be held in conjunction with the Annual Tulip Show. We are 
negotiating with the manager of the Holland Bulb Growers Association to have 
a collection of choice tulip blooms flown in from Holland for this exhibition. 
Every effort is being made to make this Show larger and more interesting than 
ever before. 

In addition to the Show, which will cover two of our main exhibition halls on 
the street floor, spring flowers, with tulips predominating, will be on display 
in the library and in the rooms and offices throughout the building. Tea will be 
served in the Trustees Room from 3 to 5 P. M. 

A special committee has been appointed by President Ames to carry on the 
various activities to commemorate our 125th Anniversary. Mr. Seth L. Kelsey 
is Chairman of the Committee. Members of the Committee are: Mr. Harold 
S. Ross, Mrs. William A. Parker, Mrs. John S. Ames, Mrs. Irving C. Wright, 
Mrs. John Cunningham, Mr. Ernest Borowski, Mr. Aubrey B. Butler, Dr. 
Donald Wyman and Mr. George Taloumis. 

The most important event on the schedule of the Anniversary Committee 
will be a special loan exhibition featuring Flowers in Art and Decoration to be 
held for 10 days beginning October 24. In advance of the opening of this exhibi- 
tion, there will be a luncheon for members of the Society at the Harvard Club at 
which Governor and Mrs. Herter will be the guests of honor. Mrs. Herter will 
officially open the exhibition which will continue through November 3. This 
exhibition is considered of such importance and is expected to create so much 
interest that the Committee on Exhibitions has decided to eliminate the Chrys- 

16 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

anthemum Show this year and request exhibitors to participate in the October 
Show. 

In October, our Society will entertain the American Horticultural Council 
for its Annual Meeting. Elaborate plans are underway to give this distinguished 
group of horticulturists a memorable reception. 

This report contains only a brief resume of some of our activities. As I have 
told you before, we never have a dull moment at Horticultural Hall and I am 
grateful for the enthusiasm that is always expressed by the various members of 
the staff as well as from the Chairmen of the various committees. I would be 
remiss indeed if I did not pay tribute to our metropolitan newspapers, radio and 
television stations for the outstanding coverage they give our events through 
the year. 

In closing I would like to express my appreciation for the wonderful coopera- 
tion given me by the Officers, Trustees and members of the Committees in the 
course of the year. I would like to express my sincere thanks to the members 
of the staff for their loyalty and assistance, and I hope that I may have this same 
confidence and loyalty in the future. 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 



Results of the Balloting at the Annual Meeting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 67 votes having been cast, and the fol- 
lowing persons were declared elected: 
President: John S. Ames 
Vice-President: Oliver Wolcott 

Trustees: (For three years) Mr. Albert C. Burrage, Mr. Edward Dane, 
Mr. Walter Hunnewell, Mr. Seth L. Kelsey and Mrs. William A. Parker. 
(For two years) Mrs. Roger S. Warner. 



17 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

May i introduce the members of your Exhibition Committee: 

Mrs. William A. Parker 
Mr. Ray M. Koon 
Mr. Harold Stevenson 
Mr. Seth Kelsey 
Mr. George W. Butterworth 
Mr. John S. Ames 
Mr. Arno Nehrling 

We report a good year in all its various aspects. The quality of all 
shows held was superb and many new ideas in staging were demonstrated. 
In all our experience with Massachusetts Horticultural Society shows, we 
have never received better cooperation from the trustees, officers, staff, mem- 
bers and exhibitors. We set high standards, and everyone did their best to 
make it an outstanding year. Each one interested in the several shows seemed 
to feel it was a challenge to do their best and we really believe that this year we 
nearly attained perfection. The total attendance at all shows exceeded last 
year, and we made our budget requirements. 

With all our thanks to all of you fellow members who did the job so well. 

George W. Butterworth, Chairman 

Committee on Exhibitions 




Spring Flower Show Notables: Mr. Arthur Amadon, Announcer, WBZ; 
Mrs. Stephen Wheatland, Chariman of the Women's Exhibitions Commit- 
tee, President Ames and Lord Rosse of the Royal Horticultural Society 

18 




Joseph J. Lane, "House and Garden," New York City, receives the Large 
Gold Medal of the Society from Seth L. Kelsey, Trustee of the Society 

19 




20 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

i 



j/"lf njhe 1953 Children's Show was probably nearer to perfection than any 
other Children's Show ever held. This was remarked by several of the 
judges. The classes in flower arrangement were not only filled to capacity 
but the entries had a real professional aspect. 

The season started wet, cold and rainy, with an excess of about ten inches of 
rainfall by May 9th. Then the rain stopped, especially in the metropolitan area, 
and with the exception of a few showers, there was no rain until about Septem- 
ber 1st. About Show time the entire New England area experienced the worst 
heat wave, of ten days duration, in ninety years. This very unusual season had 
no effect on the size and quality of our Show, however, there being a total of 
1295 entries, 15 more than in 1952. A breakdown of the entries in the various 
classes showed less entries in many of the flower classes and more in the vegetable 
classes. A terrific wind and rain storm the night before the Show ruined many of 
the prospective flower exhibits, the individual blossoms being torn to pieces. 

An educational exhibit entitled "Corn is King" was one of the finest pieces 
of educational work that ever graced the tables of this Show. Besides winning 
first prize, it was awarded the Society's bronze medal. The large school garden 
on the Cummings Estate in Woburn, operated by the Boston School Depart- 
ment in cooperation with the Park Department, had an outstanding display and 
165 prize winning entries in the individual classes. 

The 4-H Club exhibit in the upper hall, under the able direction of Earle H. 
Nodine, Assistant State Club Leader, filled the tables to overflowing. Here 
again there was an increase in vegetables and less flowers due to the storm previ- 
ously mentioned. This exhibit certainly was a credit to the 4-H Club members 
of the Commonwealth and their leaders. 

One spectator after having visited the various sections of the Show said "That 
is the best thing I have seen in a long time." 

As a member of the Committee, presenting this report on the Children's 
Garden Exhibit for 1953, I wish to thank the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society for its helpful interest and genuine assistance to the School and Home 
Garden movement. 

Henry G. Wendler 

for the 
Committee on Children's Gardens 



21 




Display of Daffodils, by Pride's of Worcester. 1954 Daffodil Show 



22 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

i 



/" ffl njhe committee on prizes had a very busy year and judged at all eight shows 
of the Society. The largest of these was the annual Spring Flower Show 
comprising more than seven acres of exhibits, with a total of 181 entries. 
At the smaller shows, such as the camellia, tulip and daffodil exhibits, the prize 
committee did all the judging. However, at the larger shows, qualified judges 
are invited to participate. 

The committee held four meetings during the past year and one joint meeting 
with the Committee on Exhibitions. At this meeting the various problems con- 
fronting both committees were discussed at length, resulting in closer coopera- 
tion and harmonious relationship between the two. 

I regret to report the resignation of a valued member of this committee, Mr. 
Edmund Mezitt, due to pressure of business. We were very fortunate in securing 
Mr. Milford Lawrence to fill the vacancy. 

At a meeting held in January 1954, the 125th Anniversary Committee voted 
to award a special Massachusetts Horticultural Society certificate to the most 
meritorious exhibit at each recognized flower show in the state. To date the 
following awards have been made: 

At the Western Massachusetts Flower Show held in Springfield, there were 
four large gardens in competition, and the one called the "Queen's Garden", 
staged by the Connecticut Valley Horticultural Society, was considered the 
most beautiful exhibit in the entire Show and was awarded this Society's 
Anniversary Certificate. 

At the Worcester Spring Flower Show, Worcester, the Anniversary Certifi- 
cate of this Society was awarded to Hixon's Greenhouses, Worcester, for a Spring 
Garden. This award was very well received and was published on the front pages 
of the newspapers in that city. 

At our own Spring Flower Show, the 125th Anniversary Gold Medal Award 
went to the Women's Exhibitions Committee. The Prize Committee felt that it 
best exemplified the theme of the Show, "'Gardens Old and New." 

There was also a special Anniversary Award given at our Spring Show called 
Horticulture magazine's 50th Anniversary Gold Medal Award. This was 
awarded to Harold D. Stevenson, Rockland, for his overall plan of Grand Hall, 
as well as the seascape depicting the Boston waterfront in 1829. 

Within the past year, Mrs. Beatrix Farrand of Bar Harbor, Maine, presented 
a beautiful silver bowl to be used as a rotating trophy for the best exhibit of 
Azaleas or Rhododendrons at our Spring Show. It pleased me greatly when 
this bowl was awarded for the first time to Mr. & Mrs. John S. Ames for their 
memorable garden of Azaleas at our Spring Show. 

I feel that I should also make mention of the Bulkley Medal of the Garden 
Club of America which was awarded this year to our Society for the general 
excellence of its 125th Anniversary Spring Show. Usually this coveted medal 
has been presented to an individual exhibitor. 

In closing, may I express my gratitude to the Officers and Trustees of this 
Society and to the Executive Secretary and his staff for their unfailing support. 

Ernest Borowski, Chairman, Committee on Prizes 

23 




Alexander Heimlich receives President's Cup from President John S. 
Ames for a rock garden at the Spring Show featuring alpine plants 



24 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 



The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommendation of the 
Committee on Gardens, Oliver Wolcott, chairman. 

The Society s Gold Medal: 

Mrs. Arthur Adams, Dover. A wild pool with lawns rising to the house and 
with a circling path through its wooded background planted with a wide assort- 
ment of native flowers and ground covers, an arbor of espaliered fruit trees in a 
garden that is itself enclosed with fruit espaliered in various forms, and the 
many flowering trees and shrubs, combine to convey the epitome of spring. 

The Society s Silver Medal: 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford C. Walker, Newton. Their neighborliness had made of 
the bordering public sidewalk and their own retaining wall a path of beauty and 
horticultural education for the passer-by, where birches shade the perfectly 
kept gravel edged with lawn, and the sloping wall down which alpines tumble 
amid pockets of flowers. 

Dr. Allen C. Brailey, Newton Highlands. A steep hillside terraced, where 
paths of shavings lead down among unusual plantings of wild flowers and rest- 
ful nooks, testify to the owner's taste and energy and give much pleasure to the 
guest. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Humphrey, Brookline. On the one side lawns slop- 
ing to a brook and rising beyond to a coppice, and on the other a great ledge, 
enclose the house with its terrace of flowers and espaliered trees. 

The Society's Bronze Medal: 

Mrs. Grace Burnham, Marblehead. A garden on ledges overlooking the 
harbor, showing by its collection of well-grown shrubs, vines, and flowers a 
lifetime of horticultural skill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Salvage, Tedesco Point, Swampscott. A garden of 
roses and perennials, a lawn sloping to the sea, an effectively planted ledge and 
great trees, all with an unusual perfection of maintenance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S. Ward, Marblehead. Their hard work and love of the 
earth have made an unpromising site teem with plantings that give a privacy 
of great charm. 

The Society s Certificate: 

Andover Inn, Andover, for lawns and an old-fashioned garden where its 
guests may find seclusion, and refreshment for the spirit. 



25 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, for a garden whose plantings 
of trees and shrubs, whose borders are in constant bloom, and whose well-kept 
turf contribute beauty to the City at all seasons. 

Stowaway Sweets, Marblehead, for a well-kept garden and plantings that 
surround the old house containing the candy shop. An instance where com- 
merce has beautified its neighborhood. 



,:;.,,;,, 




Wim 



.^|§S§§1*? 

MfSBm 






Ray Koon, Director of the Waltham Field Station. 
Recipient of the Large Gold Medal of the Society 

26 




Report of the Library Committee 

The following facts show the great growth in the use of the Library in 1953: 
1400 members borrowed books, an increase of 400 over 1952. 
6100 books were loaned, an increase of 800 over 1952. This is the largest 

number ever loaned by the Library. 
600 books were added to the Library, which now has a total of nearly 

30,000 books. 
Of those who borrowed books, % were hobby gardeners and x /i profes- 
sional. 
During 1953 the following was accomplished: 

The re-cataloguing of the books was finished. This 13-year project cost 
$38,702. There should be a reduction in the annual cost of the Library starting 
in 1955. 

A microfilm has been made of the card catalogue and deposited in a bank. 
If the cards were destroyed by fire they could easily be replaced from the 
microfilm which is a great safeguard. 

We had in the Library 13,000 old periodicals, many of which were not 
needed. A survey has been made of these by a committee of three: Mr. John 
Wister, Mr. E. I. Farrington and Mr. Daniel Foley, to whom we owe great 
thanks. 

The 1954 projects include the following: 

The unneeded old periodicals will be discarded giving more shelf room for 
future library additions. 

The Burrage collection oi prints and rare old books is now being added to the 
Library and catalogued. 

A list of duplicate and surplus books is being made up and these will be placed 
on sale. 

Steps will be taken this year to make known to our members the wonderful 
collection of horticultural books now available by articles in Horticulture 
and by the current revision of the 400 Book Catalogue now in press. This Cata- 
logue is sent to all new members and to all old members who request a copy. 
As usual the list of new books will be published in this Yearbook. An annotated 
list of 125 Great American Garden Books will be published in the fall. 

Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 

Committee on the Library 



27 







725^ Annivers, 



Grand Hall showing knot 
garden in foreground staged 
by Bartlett Gardens, Ham- 
ilton. Left: Boston water- 
front scene and cottage 
garden staged by Harold 
D. Stevenson, Rockland. 
Winner of Horticulture 
Magazine's 50th Anniver- 
sary award. Right: Replica 
of dooryard garden of 
wealthy Boston merchant 
in 1829 staged by Weston 
Nurseries, Weston, under 
direction of F. W. Sellner. 





Garden Patterns of Two Centuries was 
the theme of the garden area planned by 
the Women's Exhibitions Committee of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 
The overall design was executed by Mrs. 
Irving C. Wright. It included one section 
commemorating the 125th Anniversary 
of the Society, with five enclosed gardens 
and two terraces in the style of that period 
featuring treillage in the manner of Sir 
Humphrey Repton, great English land- 
scape architect of the late 1 8th and early 
19th century. The second area was con- 
temporary in treatment and featured 
spring gardens with cinder block walls 
and flowering trees. The main garden of 
the Repton period was planted by the 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. 



y Spring Show 



:*:■?&*■'.- 





Garden of Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Humphrey, Brookline 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Garden of Dr. Allen C. Brailey, Newton Highlands 
Awarded a Silver Medal 

30 




Garden of Mrs. Grace Burnham, Marblehead 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 



31 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1953 
The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for the most outstanding exhibit in 1953. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Mr. Edward I. Farrington, East Weymouth, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Mr. Arnold M. Davis, Cleveland, Ohio, for outstanding work in horticultural 
education. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

Mr. Francis Meilland, Cap d'Antibes, Alpes-Maritimes, France, for developing 
outstanding roses. 

Albert C. Burrage Porch Fund Medal 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Febiger, Manchester, for a beautifully developed terrace 
attached to their home. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Arthur Adams, Dover, for a garden of intimate charm. 

Prof. Ray M. Koon, Waltham, for horticultural achievements in behalf of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Mr. Joseph J. Lane, New York, New York, for oustanding public service to 

horticulture. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Dr. Allen G. Brailey, Newton Highlands, for a terraced garden of wild flowers. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Humphrey, Brookline, for an unusual garden with a 

terrace of flowers. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford H. Walker, Newton, for a wall garden of unusual charm. 

Bronze Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Grace Burnham, Marblehead, for a ledge garden showing unusual horti- 
cultural skill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Salvage, Swampscott, for a garden of roses and peren- 
nials maintained to perfection. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S. Ward, Marblehead, for a garden that gives privacy 
and has great charm. 

32 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1953 

Garden Certificates of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Andover Inn, Andover, for lawns and an old-fashioned garden where its guests 
may find seclusion, and refreshment for the spirit. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist. Boston, for a garden of trees and shrubs, borders 
in constant bloom, well-kept turf, all contributing beauty to the City at all 
seasons. 

Stowaway Sweets, Marblehead, for a well-kept garden and plantings that sur- 
round the old house containing the Candy Shop. An instance where com- 
merce has beautified its neighborhood. 

PRESIDENT'S CUP 

Weston Nurseries, Hopkinton, for formal borders featuring trees and shrubs at 
the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
horticultural society of new york 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for a formal exhibit of acacias, at the 
Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Mr. Albert Hulley, Middleboro, for a garden of clematis and roses at the 
Spring Show. 

George Holliday Memorial Prize 

Thomas Allen, Chestnut Hill, for a group of schizanthus and cinerarias at the 
Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Chestnut Hill Garden Club, for the most charming exhibit in the Garden Club 
Section at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Winter Gardeners, for a plant room at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Prize 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for a formal exhibit of acacias at the 
Spring Show. 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Johnson Bros., Inc., Woburn, for rose exhibits at the Spring Show. 

The Bulkley Medal of the 
Garden Club of America 

Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, for a pruning exhibit at the Spring Show. 

33 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1953 

Book: "Rare Greenhouse Plants" 

Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, Norristown, Pa., for Camellia rosea superba, 
best bloom in the Show. 

Crystal Vases 

Breck's, Boston, for daffodil Moonrise, best bloom in the Show. Harold S. 
Ross, Hingham, for tulip Tubergen's Glory, best bloom in the Show. 

American Orchid Society Trophy 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for a group of orchids at the Spring 
Show. 

New England Gladiolus Society 
34th Anniversary Prize 

An illuminated scroll to Dr. John J. Eppig, Port Washington, N. Y., for gladi- 
olus Sunspot. 

Gold Medals 

Arnold Arboretum, for pruning and propagating exhibits at the Spring Show. 
Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for an educational exhibit 

of fruits. 
Bartlett Gardens, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 
Birchville Gardens, Plainville, Conn., for the most meritorious exhibit in the 

Gladiolus Show. 
Ernest Borowski, for a group of azaleas and genista fragrans. 
Boston Market Gardeners, for an educational exhibit of vegetables. 
Boston School of Flower Arrangement (Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director), for a 

series of Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations. 
Boston School Garden, Woburn, for a display of vegetables. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 

Breck's, for a formal spring garden at the Spring Show. 
F. I. Carter & Sons, for a cactus and succulent garden at the Spring Show. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden featuring rhododendrons at the 

Spring Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for an informal Southern garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Alexander I. Heimlich, for a rock garden at the Spring Show. 
Albert A. Hulley, for a formal garden of clematis and roses at the Spring Show 
Massachusetts Department of Conservation, for an exhibit planted with native 

shrubs and wild flowers at the Spring Show. 
Matinecock Greenhouses, Oyster Bay, N. Y. (at New York), for the best com- 
mercial garden in the Show. 
National Association of Gardeners (Cape Cod Branch), for a bank planting of 

primroses at the Spring Show. 

34 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1953 

New England Carnation Growers Association, for carnation displays at the 

Spring Show. 
New York Agricultural Experiment Station, for a display of grapes and apples. 
Norumbega Nurseries, for a garden and terrace at the Spring Show. 
R. C. Paine, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a formal exhibit of acacias at the Spring 

Show. 
John Thibodeau, for a planting of miniature bulbs at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
The Weeders Garden Club (at Philadelphia), for the most outstanding garden 

in the Show. 
Weston Nurseries, for formal borders featuring flowering trees and shrubs at 

the Spring Show. 
Women's Exhibitions Committee (Mrs. John Cunningham, Chairman), for 

featuring gardening the year 'round at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

Arnold Arboretum, for a display "Ornamentals of Asia". 

Charles A. Best, Toronto, Canada, for a collection of six lily species (at the 

N.A.L.S. Show). 
Charles A. Best, Toronto, Canada for a stalk of Lilum x Testaceum (at the 

N.A.L.S. Show). 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, for an educational exhibit of camellias. 
W. Dexter Brownell, Jr., for a display of roses. 
Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias. 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 
Cider Hill Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias. 
Dane's Flower Shoppe, Inc., for a display of chrysanthemums. 
Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for a group of chrysanthemums 
Herb Society of America (New England Branch), for an herb garden for the 

blind at the Spring Show. 
Johnson Bros., for exhibits of roses at the Spring Show. 
Lommerse & Heemskerk, for a display of lily-flowered tulips. 
Massachusetts Orchid Society, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Middlesex County Beekeepers Association, for a beekeeping exhibit at the 

Spring Show. 
National Association of Gardeners (Newport Branch), for a spring garden at 

the Spring Show. 
National Association of Gardeners (Newport Branch), for a display of chrysan- 
themums. 
National Cranberry Association, for an educational cranberry display. 
North Shore Horticultural Society (at Manchester), for a green and white 

garden. 
Northern Nut Growers Association, for a display of nuts. 
Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, Norristown, Pa., for a display of camellias. 
"Pride's", for a display of daffodils. 

35 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1953 

J. L. Richardson, Waterford, Ireland, for a display of Irish daffodils at the 

Spring Show. 
John Thibodeau, for a collection of miniature narcissi. 
Wellesley College, Botany Department, for a Mexican sub-tropical garden at 

the Spring Show. 

Bronze Medals 

Berkeley Garden Club, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Latin School Group, Michael J. Connelly, Leader, for the story of corn. 

Mrs. Frances R. Williams, for a display of hostas. 

First Class Certificates 

Azalea Jane P. Hunnewell, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Camellia S. Peter Nyce, exhibited by Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce. 

Carnation Light Pink Littlefield, exhibited by S. Arthur Peterson at the Spring 

Show. 
Carnation Tetra Red, exhibited by Emerson Evans at the Spring Show. 
Rose Copper Glow, exhibited by W. Dexter Brownell, Jr. 

Awards of Merit 

Azalea Glacier, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea Mother's Day, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Begonia Corinne, exhibited by The Merrys. 

Chrysanthemum Marjorie Mills' Favorite, exhibited by the Harry Quint 

Greenhouses. 
Rose Handsome Red, exhibited by W. Dexter Brownell, Jr. 

Votes of Commendation 

Carnation Karen, exhibited by A. C. Farr at the Spring Show. 
Carnation Scarlet Sim, exhibited by Reading Greenhouses at Spring Show. 
Carnation variegated sport of Hercules, exhibited by Charles Trombetta at the 
Spring Show. 

Cultural Certificates 

Breck's, for a collection of daffodils. 

Breck's, for a display of daffodials. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias at the Spring Show. 

Cultural Certificates 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

William C. Doherty, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

Thomas Galvin, for large-flowered dahlias. 

Albert A. Hulley, for clematis and roses at the Spring Show. 

Sydney Kimpton, for a display of dahlias. 

C. H. Lothrop, for a display of double snapdragons at the Spring Show. 

Thomas Murray, for Strelitzia reginae at the Spring Show. 

36 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1953 

Edward Norberg, for a group of gloxinias at the Spring Show. 
Edna Roberts, for a group of saintpaulias. 
H. R. Sweet, for a miltonia plant at the Spring Show. 
John Thibodeau, for Iris bucharica at the Spring Show. 
John A. Williams, for anemones at the Spring Show. 

Votes of Thanks 

Mrs. H. G. Arnold, for a propagation exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Boston Men's Garden Club, for an exhibit of plants and flowers. 

Dr. Francis L. Burnett, for Celeste figs. 

James Cass, for Rose Mojave, a new introduction for 1954. 

George S. Coffin, for shell beans. 

George S. Coffin, for sunflowers. 

John T. Coolidge, for Camellia Bernice Boddy. 

John T. Coolidge, for Camellia wilderi. 

Miss Martha David, for a vase of white and purple chrysanthemums. 

Mrs. Helen B. Farnham, for an African violet planting. 

Miss Bertha Holzer, for an arrangement of dried flowers. 

Longview Nursery, Mobile, A.la., for a display of camellias. 

Mrs. Madelyn McElroy, for a group of African violets. 

Mrs. Madelyn McElroy, for a partridge berry bowl. 

John Merz, for a pineapple plant. 

Harry Nickerson, for Congo watermelons. 

Frederick P. Pond, for a chrysanthemum seedling. 

Bertha Rankin, for a coxcomb. 

August Schumacher, for a display of gourds. 

John Truesdale, for cucumber, White Spine. 




Garden, Andover Inn, Andover 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 

37 




Garden at Stowaway Sweets, Marblehcad 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 




Garden of Mr. & Mrs. Clifford C. Walker, Newton 
Awarded a Silver Medal 

38 




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Arnold M. Davis, Director, Cleveland Garden Center, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Recipient of The Thomas Roland Medal 



39 




40 




41 



Report of the Treasurer 



F 



^or the year ended December 31, 1953, the income of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society amounted to $162,470 against expenses of $179,087, 
leaving after the usual minor adjustments, an operating deficit of $16,207 
for the year. This deficit compares with a net income of $4,407 in 1952 and rep- 
resents one of the relatively uncommon red ink results that the Society has 
experienced. 

In analyzing the detailed figures, I can report to you that what one might 
term the normal operations of the Society showed little deviation from the good 
results of previous years. We had a very successful Spring Show in 1953 although 
not quite so remunerative financially as that of 1952, almost entirely because of 
the larger prizes, medals, and certificates that were awarded, and not because 
of any appreciable falling off in gross receipts. The income from investments, 
furthermore, was at a new high figure. Income from membership fees also in- 
creased. Running expenses, despite continued outlays on repairs of our building 
were held well in hand. Why, then, you may ask, should the 1953 results com- 
pare unfavorably with those of 1952 in view of all the favorable facts that I have 
mentioned? 

The explanation lies almost entirely in the unusual and extraordinary ex- 
penses incurred by the efforts of the Society to improve our publication "Horti- 
culture". It is not within the province of the treasurer's report to discuss the 
many and momentous steps that have been taken to make "Horticulture" a 
more attractive and useful publication, but I can assure you that these steps 
involved a larger expenditure of funds than has been customary to allocate to 
our Publications Department. I, for one, firmly believe that these expenditures 
will eventually prove rewarding, and I am in no way critical of the fact that 
they have been responsible for our 1953 deficit. 

Again, I must emphasize as I have in previous years, regardless of the operat- 
ing results that I was reporting to you, that our organization is dedicated to 
promote the best and broadest interests of horticultural pursuits, and if in so 
doing a deficit is incurred, it is nothing of which to be ashamed if we are making 
real progress toward a more useful position in the community. 

It is entirely possible because of continued large expenditures on "Horticul- 
ture" that an operating deficit for the Society is in prospect for 1954 although 
our income to date has stood up well by comparison with that of the previous 
year. I am confident, however, that even if another sizeable deficit should occur, 
it will not make too much of a dent in our present strong financial resources. 

The detailed figures of our operations are available in our audited report, 
and as always, I welcome their inspection by our members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stedman Buttrick 
Treasurer 



42 



Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT DECEMBER 31, 1953 

Assets 

Cash in banks and on hand $ 53,396.91 

Accounts Receivable — "Horticulture" 10,482. 93 

Accounts Receivable $ 10,982.93 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in collection .... 500 . 00 

% 10,482.93 

Accounts Receivable — Other 301 . 20 

Investments at Book Value 859,438. 36 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 7,942 . 50 

Capital Assets 602,895.38 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to buildings. . . . 57,750.28 
Library 46,580.47 

$602,895.38 

Deferred Charges 10,211 .42 

Spring Show, 1954 $ 1,343.45 

Prepaid Insurance and expense 4,903.74 

Plant Buyers Guide Inventory 938. 54 

Almanacs, Binders, and Lawn Book Inven- 
tories 3,025.69 

$ 10,211.42 

$1,544,668.70 



Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities $ 1 9,746 . 69 

Accounts Payable $ 17,392.91 

Taxes Withheld 1,475.00 

Accrued Commissions — "Horticulture". . . . 523.17 

Social Security Taxes accrued 91 .43 

Credit Balances Accounts Receivable 264.18. 

$ 19,746.69 



Deferred Income 15,915.00 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8,361 .24 

Principal $ 7,942 . 50 

Unexpended Income 418 . 74 

$ 8,361.24 
43 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Sundry Funds 789,524.69 

Special Uses: 

Principal $221,098.66 

Unexpended Income 4,620.00 

225,718.66 
General Uses: Principal 563,806.03 

$789,524.69 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 130,972. 13 

Balance, January 1, 1953 $131,453.75 

Deduct: Net loss on securities sold 481 .62 

$130,972.13 
Surplus (Earned) 15,624.25 



$1,544,668.70 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income 

1953 1952 

Income From Investments $ 56,281 .18 $ 55,493. 15 

Membership Fees (after members' sub- 
scription to "Horticulture") 33,976 . 02 27,494 . 62 

Rentals 11,143.28 12,354.97 

Spring Show 98,060.82 100,981.31 

Chrysanthemum Show 1,057.02 7,946.51 

"Horticulture" Loss 37,076.37 27,607.62 

Other Receipts 1,076.13 2,523.75 

$162,470.04 $175,299.67 

Expenditures 

Building Expenses .. , $46,788.41 $41,236.83 

Library Expenses 
Paid from Restricted 

Funds $ 2,459.99 $ 1,961.00 

Paid from General Funds 1 3,486 .71 1 4, 589 . 82 

$ 15,946.70 $ 16,550.82 

Office and General Salaries and expenses 61,224.19 67,466.49 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expense 3,486.67 3,772.70 

Awards, Lectures, Medals & Certificates 

Lectures paid from General Funds. . 915.72 774.86 
Prizes, medals and certificates paid 

from General Funds 2,131.26 3,415.08 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid 

from Spring Show 41,800.65 30,792.00 

44 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Medals, and Lectures paid from Re- 
stricted Funds 1,757.54 

Awards at shows paid from Restricted 

Funds 5,035.93 

$179,087.07 

Net Income or Loss, All Funds % 76,677 .03 

Elimination of Expenses included above 

paid from restricted funds Income. . . 9,253.46 

$ 7,363.57 
Elimination of Income included above 

allocated to restricted funds 8,843.96 

Net Income or Loss $ 76,207 . 53 



1,959.72 

5,283.93 
$171,252.43 
$ 4,047.24 

9,204.65 
$ 13,251.89 

8,843.96 
$ 4,407.93 






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Garden of Mr. & Mrs. Louis H. Salvage, Swampscott 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 



45 



Books Added to the Library 

May 7, 1953- May 7, 1954 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Doolittle. R. Southwest gardening. Albuquerque, 1953 

Douglas, J. S. Hydroponics, the Bengal system. London, 1952 

Edwards, R. G. The Australian garden book. Sydney, 1950 

Gillespie, Norvell. Gillespie's garden scrapbook. Los Angeles, 1953 

Hawthorn, L. R. & Pollard, L. H. Vegetable and flower seed production. New 

York, 1954 
Herbert, D. A. Gardening in warm climates. Sydney, 1952 
Hewett, E. J. Sand and water culture methods used in the study of plant nutrition. 

Bucks, Eng., 1952 
Hudson, C. J., jr. Hudson's southern gardening. Atlanta, 1953 
Internationale Gartenbau-Ausstellung, Hamburg. Handbuch, May-Oct. 1953 
Koon, R. M. Out in the open. Boston, 1954 

Lane Publishing Co. Sunset western garden book. Menlo Park, Calif., 1954 
Lisle, C. The growing year. New York, 1953 

Matthews, J. W. The New Zealand garden dictionary; 5th ed. Wellington, 1949 
Newcomer, H. R. Gardening in San Antonio and South Texas. 1953 
Northen, H. T. & R. The secret of the green thumb. New York, 1954 
Young, P. R. Elementary lessons in gardening. Columbus, O., 1953 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soils 

Cocannouer, J. A. Farming with nature. Norman, Okla., 1954 
Faulkner, E. H. Soil restoration. London, 1953 
Very, A. How to use peat moss. Boston, 1953 
Waksman, S. A. Soil microbiology. New York, 1952 

DISEASES AND PESTS 

Braun, H. & Riehm, E. Krankheiten und schadlinge der kulturpflanzen. Berlin, 

1953 
Dimock, A. W. The gardener's ABC of pest and disease. New York, 1953 
Ford A. ed. Audubon's butterflies, moths and other studies. New York, 1952 
Gram, E. & Weber, A. Plant diseases in orchard, nursery and garden crops. 

London, 1953 
Hanna, L. W. Hanna's handbook of agricultural chemicals. Forest Grove, Ore., 

1952 
Ong, E. R. de. Insect, fungus and weed control. New York, 1953 
Stiles, W. Trace elements in plants and animals; 2d ed. New York, 1951 
Westcott, C. Garden enemies. New York, 1953 

46 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Handbook on dwarf potted trees. New York, 1954 

. Handbook on rock gardens. New York, 1953 

Fenska, R. J. The new tree experts manual. New York, 1954 

Green, L. M. Perennials in a bishop's garden. Phil.. 1953 

Hellyer, A. G. L. Encyclopedia of plant portraits. London, 1953 

Hills, L. D. Alpines without gardens. London, 1953 

Johnson. E. W. Ornamental shrubs for the southern Great Plains. Wash., D. C., 

1951 
Johnson, M. P.. comp. The concise encyclopedia of favorite flowers, ed. by M. 

Free. New York, 1953 
Kumlien, L. L. Evergreens. New York, 1954 

Lord, E. E. Shrubs and trees for Australian gardens. Melbourne, 1948 
Marx, D. S. Trees of your town. Loveland, O., 1953 
Mayfair Nurseries. New handbook of rare alpines and rock plants. Hillsdale, 

N. J., 1954 
Oser, Mrs. W. Gardening in New Orleans. 1952 
Robbins, A. R. Annuals. New York, 1954 
Rockwell, F. F. & Grayson, E. C. Complete book of bulbs. New York, 1953 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Boutard, C. R. Plants indoors. London, 1953 
Clark, W. H. Plants in pots. Boston, 1953 

Everett, T. H. How to grow beautiful house plants. Greenwich, Conn., 1953 
Jones. M. E. & Clark, H. F. Indoor plants and gardens. London, 1952 
Melady, J. H. Better house plants for your home. New York. 1953 
Noble, M. & Merkel, J. L. Plants indoors. New York, 1954 
Potter, C. H. A grower's guide to bedding plants. Chicago, 1953 
Ruben. W. Gardening indoors as a hobby. Asbury Park, 1953 
Steffen, A. Handbuch der marktgartnerei; 5te aufl. Berlin, 1953 
Winters. H. F. Some large-leaved ornamental plants for the tropics. Puerto Rico, 
1952 

Monographs 

American Ass'n of Botanical Gardens and Arboretums. Lilac Survey Comm. 

Lilacs for America. Swarthmore, Pa., 1953 
American Camellia Society. American Camellia yearbook, 1953. Gainesville, 

Fla.. 1953 
American Iris Society. Alphabetical iris check list 1949. Nashville, 195-? 
American Rose Society. American rose annual, 1953. Harrisburg, Pa., 1953 
Bailey, L. H. & Lawrence, G. H. M. The garden of bellflowers. New York, 1953 
Beck, C. Fritillaries. London, 1953 
Bernard. J. D. Lawns. New York, 1954 

Bertrand, A. Succulent plants other than cacti. New York, 1953 
Bowers, C. G. Winter-hardy azaleas and rhododendrons. Boston, 1954 
Boyle. L. M. Out West: growing cymbidium orchids. Los Angeles, 1952 
Corsar, K. C. Primulas in the garden; new and rev. ed. London, 1952 
Davis, B. A. Daylilies and how to grow them. London, 1954 
Foster, M. B., etc. Bromeliads, a cultural handbook. 1953 

47 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Gilbert, P. A. Orchids, their culture and classification. Sydney, 1951 

Hume, H. H. Hollies. New York, 1953 

Morrison, B. Y. The Glenn Dale azaleas. Wash., D. G., 1953 

Noble, M. You can grow orchids. Jacksonville, Fla., 1953 

North American Lily Society. Lily yearbook, no. 6. Geneva, N. Y., 1953 

Rector, G. K. African violet variety list, 1953. Menlo Park, Calif., 1953 

Royal Horticultural Society. Daffodil year book, 1954. London, 1953 

. The lily year book, 1954. London, 1953 

Schulz, P. Amaryllis — and how to grow them. New York, 1954 

Schwantes, M. H. G. The cultivation of the mesembryanthemaceae, ed. by E. 
Shurly. Elstree, Eng., 1953 

Shepherd, R. E. History of the rose. New York, 1953 

. Roses. New York, 1954 

Southern California Camellia Society. The camellia, its culture and nomencla- 
ture; 4th rev. ed. Pasadena, 1954 

Street, F. Hardy rhododendrons. New York, 1954 

Symons-Jeune, B. H. B. Phlox. New York, 1953 

Walker, M. C. Dahlias for every garden. New York, 1954 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HERBS 

Barker, R. E. Small fruits. New York, 1954 
Brooks, R. M. Western fruit gardening. Berkeley, Calif., 1953 
Bush, C. D. Nut grower's handbook; rev. ed. New York, 1952 
Dungan, G. H., etc., eds. You can grow more corn. Chicago, 1953 
Hogner, D. C. Herbs from the garden to the table. New York, 1953 
Royal Horticultural Society. The fruit year book, 1954. London, 1953 
Shoemaker, J. S. Vegetable growing; 2d ed. New York, 1953 
Swartout, J. M. Vegetables. New York, 1954 
Taylor, N. Fruit in the garden. New York, 1954 

. Herbs in the garden. New York, 1953 

Wyld, R. The how-to book on strawberries. Honeoye Falls, N. Y., 1954 

AGRICULTURE 

The Countryman's guide. Noroton, Conn., 1954 

Gerard, G. Electricity in the garden. London, 1953 

Jefferson, T. Thomas Jefferson's farm book, ed. by E. M. Betts. Princeton, N. J., 

1953 
Pearson, H. S. Profitable country living for retired people. Garden City, N. Y., 

1953 
Sykes, F. Food, farming and the future. London, 1953 
Tressler, D. K., etc. Into the freezer and out; 2d ed. New York, 1953 

NATURAL HISTORY 

Baxter, W. J. Today's revolution in weather. New York, 1953 
Hadlow, L. Climate, vegetation and man. New York and London, 1953 
Hammond, C. S. and Co. Hammond's guide to nature hobbies, by E. L. Jordan. 

New York, 1953 
Murray, W. J. C. Sanctuary planted. New York, 1953 
Terres, J. K. Songbirds in your garden. New York, 1953 

48 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

ECONOMICS AND CONSERVATION 

McConkey, O. M. Conservation in Canada. New York, 1952 

Osborn, F. Limits of the earth. Boston, 1953 

Parks, W. R. Soil conservation districts in action. Ames, la., 1952 

Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture. Official judging rules and guide to 

exhibitors. Wellington, 1950 
Schulz, W. F. Conservation and administration. New York, 1953 
Willman, H. A. The 4-H handbook. Ithaca, N. Y., 1952 
Wood, A. W. Flower show guide. New York, 1954 

FINE ARTS 

Marcus, F. N. Flower painting. New York, 1953 

Simeon, M. How to draw garden flowers. New Yorkj 1953 

FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

Bear, E. Better flower arrangements for home and exhibition. New York, 1953 
Benz, M. Flowers, their creative designs. Houston, Texas, 1952 
Berrall, J. Flowers in glass. New York, 1954 

. The history of flower arrangement. New York, 1953 

Biddle, D. & Blom, D. Christmas idea book. New York, 1953 

Brooks, M. J. Flower arrangement workbook 2. New York, 1954 

Conway, J. G. Treasury of flower arrangement. New York, 1953 

Donna (Texas) Garden Club. Arrangements on parade; 3d ed. 1953 

Flower Arrangers Club of Georgia. Artistry in arrangement, v. 2. Hopeville, 1953 

Hausen, A. B. Arranging flowers for the church. Clarinda, la., 1952 

Rogers, M. Flower arrangements anyone can do anywhere. New York, 1954 

Spry, C. The art of arranging flowers. New York, 1953 

. A Constance Spry anthology. New York, 1954 

Starker, C. Carl Starker's album of arrangements. Seattle, 1953 
Wilson, A. B. Color in flower arrangement. New York, 1954 

TRAVEL AND PLANT HUNTING 

Cowan, J. M., ed. Journeys and plant introductions of George Forrest. London, 

1953 
Goddard, R. H. Australian landscapes in miniature. Sydney, 1952 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Allen, Lady and Jellicoe, S„ Things we see: gardens. England, 1953 

Allinger, G. Das gartenheim. Munich, 1953 

Chisholm, N. Australian gardens. Melbourne, 1949 

Fearon, E. The making of a garden. London, 1948 

Gallion, A. T. and Eisner, S. The urban pattern. New York, 1950 

Gardens and gardening, v. 4: Rock, wall and water, ed. by F. A. Mercer and R. 

Hay. New York, 1953 
Kuck, L. E. One hundred Kyoto gardens. London, 1935 
McKenna, P. J. and A. B. Small home landscaping. New York, 1953 
Morton, J. F. and Ledin, R. B. 400 plants of South Florida. 1952 
Newsom, S. A thousand years of Japanese gardens. Tokyo, 1953 
Roper, L. Royal gardens. London, 1953 

49 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Shepheard, P. Modern gardens. New York, 1954 

Sunset Magazine. How to build outdoor furniture. Menlo, Calif., 1953 

. Sunset ideas for hillside homes. Menlo Park, Calif., 1953 

Taylor, G. Old gardens of London. London, 1953 
Taylor, N. The everblooming garden. New York, 1954 

. Fragrance in the garden. New York, 1953 

Tunnard, C. The city of man. New York, 1953 



BOTANY 

General 

Beaty, J. Plant breeding for everyone. Boston, 1954 

Crocker, W. and Barton, L. V. Physiology of seeds. Waltham, Mass., 1953 
Dice, L. R. Natural communities. Ann Arbor, 1952 

Field, M. D. and Smith, F. P. See how they grow. Middlesex, England, 1952 
Fothergill, P. G. Historical aspects of organic evolution. New York, 1953 
Haupt, A. W. Plant morphology. New York, 1953 
Lawrence, W. J. C. Practical plant breeding; 3d ed. London, 1951 
Marx, D. S. Trees of the woods. Loveland, O., 1953 
Somerville, W. How a tree grows. London, 1927 
Storer, J. H. The web of life. New York, 1953 

Symposium on the origin and distribution of cultivated plants in South Asia. 
New Delhi, 1951 

Monographs 

Ames, O. and Correll, D. S. Orchids of Guatemala. Chicago, 1952-53 
Jay, B. A. Conifers in Britain. London, 1952 

Nicholls, W. H. Orchids of Australia, pts. 1-2. Melbourne, 1951-52 
Ramsbottom, J. Mushrooms and toadstools. London, 1953 
Summerhayes, V. S. Wild orchids of Britain. London, 1951 
Wellhausen, E.J. Races of maize in Mexico. Jamaica Plain, 1952 

Floras — U. S. 

Amnions, N. Shrubs of West Virginia. Morgantown, 1950 

Arnberger, L. P. Flowers of the Southwest mountains. Sante Fe, 1952 

Friesner, G. M. and Hill, M. J. Wild flowers of spring. Buffalo, 1 946 

Gottscho, S. The pocket guide to the wild flowers. New York, 1951 

Greene, W. F. and Blomquist, H. L. Flowers of the South. Chapel Hill, 1953 

Hylander, C. J. The Macmillan wild flower book. New York, 1954 

Jennings, O. E. Wild flowers of western Pennsylvania and the upper Ohio Basin. 

Pittsburgh, 1953 
Kearney, T. H. and Peebles, R. H. Arizona flora. Berkeley, Calif., 1951 
King, J. Telling trees. New York, 1953 
Nelson, R. A. Plants of Rocky Mountain National Park; rev. ed. Wash., D. C, 

1953 
Piatt, R. A pocket guide to the trees. New York, 1953 
Sterling, D. Trees and their story. Garden City, 1953 
Walcott, M. V., illus. Wild flowers of America. New York, 1953 
Weber, W. A. Handbook of plants of the Colorado Front Range. Boulder, 1953 

50 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Floras — Other countries 

Gardner, C. A. West Australian wild flowers; 4th ed. Perth, 1943 
Inglis, B. D. Wild flower studies. England, 1951 

Rice, E. G., illus. Wild flowers of the Gape of Good Hope. Kirstenbosch, 1951 
Richards, E. C. Our New Zealand trees and flowers; 2d ed. Christchurch, 1949 
Williams, R. O. The useful and ornamental plants in Trinidad and Tobago; 4th 
ed. Port-of-Spain, 1951 

ESSAYS 

Christian garland; new ed. London, n.d. 
Eastwood, D. Mirror of flowers. Boston, 1954 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

Bendick, J. All around you. New York, 1951 

Cosgrove, M. Wonders of the tree world. New York, 1953 

Cutler, K. N. Junior flower arranging. New York, 1954 

Dickinson, A. The first book of plants. New York, 1953 

Earle, O. Robins in the garden. New York, 1953 

Marshall, V. S. Flower arranging for juniors. Boston, 1954 

Miner, O. I. S. The true book of plants we know. Chicago, 1953 

Reck, F. M. The 4-H story. Ames, la., 1951 

Selsam, M. E. Play with leaves and flowers. New York, 1952 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts to the Library 
from the following donors: 

Batchelder, Mrs. Charles F., jr. 

Bailey, L. H. How plants get their names. 1933 
Fabre, H. J. Bramble bees and others. 1915 

The hunting wasps. 1915 

The life of the caterpillar. 1916 

The life of the grasshopper. 1917 

The Mason bees. 1914 

Our humble helpers. 1918 



Hudson, W. H. The book of a naturalist. 1919 

Hume, H. H. Gardening in the lower South. 1929 

Jay, M. R. The garden handbook. 1931 

Kuck, L. E. One hundred Kyoto gardens. 1935 

Lamplugh, A. Flower and vase. 1929 

Nicolas, J. N. The rose annual. 1930 

. A year in the rose garden. 1936 

Peck, C. H. Edible fungi of New York, 1895-99. 1900 
Pyle, R., McFarland, J. H. and Stevens, G. A. How to grow roses. 1929 
Ramsey, L. W. and Lawrence;, C. H. The outdoor living room. 1931 
Rockwell, F. F. The book of bulbs. 1927 

■ -. Irises. 1928 

. Peonies. 1933 

Rohde, E. S. The scented garden. 1931 

Rolfe, R. T. The romance of the fungus world. 1925 

51 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Salisbury, E. J. The living garden. 1935 

Snyder, E. Florida trees. 1940 

Sudell, R. The new garden. 1936 
Boston University. College of Liberal Arts 

Ellwanger, H. B. The rose. 1882 

Heinrich, J. J. The window flower garden. 1880 

Hole, S. R. Book about roses. 1883 

Rand, E. S. Flowers for parlor and garden. 1863 
Buxton, Mrs. H. H. 

Collection of nursery catalogs. 

Collection of publications of state garden club federations. 
Coolidge, Mrs. John T. 

Gardner, C. A. West Australian wild flowers; 4th ed. 1943 
Cousens, Mrs. John 

American Rose Society. American rose annuals, 1928-1937 

. What every rose grower should know. 1931 

Burbank, L. How plants are trained to work for man. 1921 

Rockwell, F. F. Gardening indoors and under glass. 1912 

Thomas, G. C, jr. The practical book of outdoor rose growing. 1914 
Field, Allen J. 

Noble, Mary. You can grow orchids. 1953 
Graf, A. B. 

Graf, A. B. Exotic plants illustrated. 1953 
Hackett, Mrs. Joseph in memory of Frank J. Finn 

Murray, W.J. C. Sanctuary planted. 1953 

Walcott, M. V., illus. Wild flowers of America., 1953 
Havenger, Mrs. Arthur 

Internationale Gartenbau-Austellung, Hamburg. Handbuch, May-Oct. 1953 
Hunt, Mrs. Roy Arthur 

Two manuals of gardening from English manuscript notebooks of the 1 7th cen- 
tury. 1952 
New England Wild Flower Preservation Society. 

Friesner, G. M. and Hill, M.J. Wild flowers of spring. 1946 

Gottscho, S. The pocket guide to the wild flowers. 1951 

Piatt, R. A pocket guide to the trees. 1953 
Palotta, Henry 

Loudon, J. C. An encyclopaedia of agriculture ; 5th ed. 1857 
Rogers, Matilda 

Rogers, M. Flower arrangements anyone can do anywhere. 1954 
Russell, Mrs. Richard S. 

E., V. B. Sylvana's letters to an unknown friend. 1900 

Earle, A. M. Old time gardens. 1901 

Fullerton, Alice. To Persia for flowers. 1938 

My garden, v. 14-18. 1938-39 

Rohde, E. S. A garden of herbs. 1920 
Small, Col. H. E. 

New Fngland Gladiolus Society. Yearbooks, 1930-1932, 1934, 1949, 1951, 1953 
Teele, Mrs. Arthur P. 

Prevost, J.-L. Bouquets. 1945 
Tingle, John L. 

American Horticultural Society. The American lily yearbook, 1942, 1946 

52 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Tisdale, Mrs. Mary E. 

Vinton, A. E. Manuscript botanical notebook. 
Waters, Mrs. Edward A. 

Eaton, D. C. Ferns of North America. 1870-80 

Herbarium. Specimens of dried ferns. 

Lowe, E. J. Ferns, British and exotic. 1865-68 

Meehan, T. Native flowers and ferns of the United States. 1878-79 
Wellman, Mrs. Gordon B. 

American Fuchsia Society. Bulletin, no. 4-43. 1930-43 

British Fuchsia Society. Annual, 1938-1946 

Collection of pamphlets and magazine articles on fuchsias. 




Garden of Mr. & Mrs. Arthur S. Ward, Marblehead 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 



53 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 



^^ighty-five years have passed since the first seed of kindness was planted 
"^ in the heart of the tenement district of Boston, to be known as the Fruit 
-^ and Flower Mission. Volunteers were eager and ready to share their time 



and labor, to bring some joy into the lives of others during the first years. This 
fine spirit is living to-day in the hearts and minds of our volunteers in garden 
clubs, church groups and individuals. They are our most valuable assets. 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society has given us many opportunities for 
furthering our work. One of the most important has been the use of our office for 
twenty-nine years, where we have many comforts and privileges and pleasant 
surroundings. Through this interest we have received all flowers, fruits and vege- 
tables from eight flower shows; rest homes, hospitals, institutions and Commu- 
nity Centers, and many shut-ins have enjoyed the beauty and treats which the 
exhibitors made possible by these generous contributions. 

Eight hundred forty-seven hampers and cartons of flowers, vegetables and 
fruit were received from twenty-six towns and distributed by seven distributing 
centers during the summer. In Needham, school children collect and pack one 
hamper, under supervision, each season. Thus youth is being trained in the 
work of the Fruit and Flower Mission. 

Six hundred and twenty-two baskets and trays were distributed during the 
holiday seasons of Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter. In addition to many 
extra dainties, each basket sent at Christmas, contained one or more gifts. At 
Easter, a begonia plant was sent to all whom we serve in rest homes and to shut- 
ins living in one room "homes". 

Mrs. Geoffrey Whitney kindly donated fifty tickets to the Spring Flower 
Show. This is always a treat for those who have been indoors for most of the 
winter. A note of appreciation from one of the recipients expresses this joy: "I 
think the 'sharing' of such a treat with one, who could not possibly have at- 
tended, quite the happiest gesture of friendliness I can imagine. There are no 
descriptive adjectives for what all the eye and ear delights meant to one who 
loved the flowers and music, not to mention the peacock." 

The Boston State Hospital program has been carried on each month. Seven 
indoor parties, four outings and one hike gave many hours of relaxation from 
hospital routine, so sorely needed by those who are mentally ill. 

The Fruit and Flower Mission gratefully acknowledges a debt of gratitude to 
the volunteers for hours of service, to the railroads for careful handling of the 
hampers for many years, without charge, and to all groups and individuals who 
have helped to make it possible to carry on this work. 

Esther L. Camfield 

Executive Secretary 



54 



NECROLOGY 



Dr. Ralph C. Achorn 
Mr. George Wendell Adams 
Mrs. Herbert H. Albee 
Mrs. Edwin F. Atkins 
Mrs. I. Clarence Bailey 
Mr. William H. Ballard 
Miss Sarah Battelle 
Mrs. John A. Bell 
Mr. Fred M. Berry 
Mr. Ralph P. Bischoff 
Mrs. Gordon Blades 
Mrs. Frederick W. Bliss 
Mrs. Charles K. Bolton 
Dr. Josiah H. Brown 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 
Mrs. Earl Burgess 
Miss Mary C. Burnham 
Mr. I. Tucker Burr 
Mr. Charles L. Chadbourne 
Mr. Clarence M. Cobb 
Miss Helen R. Coggeshall 
Mrs. James D. Colt 
Mr. Carter G. Cook 
Miss Elsie W. Coolidge 
Mr. Edward J. Cross 
Mr. William F. Crowell 
Mr. Harold Denham 
Dr. Robert L. DeNormandie 
Mr. A. W. Dole 
Mrs. Alice G. Dow 
Miss Lillian F. Dustin 
Miss Lucile Eaves 
Mrs. John S. Edmands 
Mr. Irving S. Elliott 
Mr. H. Wendell Endicott 
Mrs. A. W. Ewell 
Mrs. Herbert B. Farnum 
Mrs. Horace Faull 
Mrs. Charles Feldman 
Mr. Frank J. Finn 



Miss Georgianna K. Fiske 
Mr. Arthur W. Fletcher 
Mr. Albert E. Flitcroft 
Mr. Merrill N. Follansbee 
Mr. Charles Stewart Forbes 
Mr. Elmer J. Foss 
Mr. Walter L. Gardner 
Mr. Charles Gattrell 
Mrs. Willard P. Gerrish 
Mr. Howard Gilmore 
Mrs. Henry Vose Green ough 
Mr. Robert P. Hackett 
Mrs. George A. Hall 
Mrs. George H. Hall 
Miss Louise Gordon Hallet 
Mrs. Winthrop A. Harvey 
Miss Alison T. Haughton 
Miss Mary S. Holbrook 
Mr. Charles E. Holbrow 
Mr. R. M. Howard 
Mr. Thomas Howden 
Miss Grace Jewell 
Mrs. Frederick H. Jones 
Prof. Ray M. Koon 
Mr. Harry V. Lawrence 
Miss Eleanor W. Leatherbee 
Mrs. Halfdan Lee 
Mr. Edgar S. Lindsay 
Mrs. Dorothy Linfield 
Miss Dorothy Litchfield 
Mr. John K. MacDonald 
Mr. Archibald S. MacGuffog 
Mr. Charles A. Maguire 
Miss Alice Manning 
Mr. Frederick Goddard May 
Mr. William J. McDevitt 
Mrs. Franklin T. Miller 
Mr. Paul B. Morgan 
Mr. John H. Morris 
Mrs. William G. Nickerson 



Mr. Henry H. Noel 
Miss Alice M. Packard 
Miss Mary Clair Parker 
Miss Emma A. Patterson 
Miss Alice W. Pearse 
Mrs. William F. Porter 
Mr. William Rengerman 
Mrs. William A. Robb 
Miss M. Elizabeth Robbins 
Miss Alice Robson 
Miss Edith B. Robson 
Mrs. D. G. Rogers 
Mr. David Frank Roy 
Mr. Harold A. Ryan 
Mr. Harry C. Sanborn 
Mr. Philip S. Sears 
Mr. George A. Sexton 
Mr. Herbert B. Shaftoe 
Mr. Frank R. Shepard 
Channing C. Simmons, M.D. 
Miss Ruth S. Soelle 
Mr. Henry M. Sondheim 
Miss J. P. Soule 
Mrs. William Stone 
Mrs. Florence B. Storer 
Miss Flora M. Stuart 
Mr. Howard O. Tanner 
Miss Lena Thompson 
Mr. Charles W. Tobey 
Mrs. Irving C. Tomlinson 
Mr. Charles L. Westman 
Mrs. T. Arthur Whitaker 
Mrs. Frank D. White 
Mrs. Herbert H. White 
Mr. Geoffrey G. Whitney 
Mrs. Henry Wolcott 
Mrs. William L. Woodbury 
Mr. Irving C. Wright 



55 



Honorary Members 



1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmstead, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. A. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1 942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1 942 Elizabeth C. WHiTE,Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 
1947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Ernest Borowski, Norwood, Massachusetts 
1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 
1948 John L. Russell, Dedham, Massachusetts 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, New York, New York 
1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Tegucigalpa, Honduras 
1950 Kenneth Post, Ithaca, New York 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mary May Binney, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburg, Scotland 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, La Canada, California 
1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Columbus, Ohio 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Conn. 

1952 Mrs. Beatrix Farrand, Bar Harbor, Maine 

1953 Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 
1953 Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 

1953 Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1953 Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon 

1953 Mrs. Bessie Raymond Buxton, Peabody, Massachusetts 

1954 Mr. Arnold Davis, Cleveland, Ohio 

1954 Mr. Edward I. Farrington, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1954 Mr. Joseph Lane, New York, New York 

1954 Mr. Francis Meilland, Alpes-Maritimes, France 

56 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

FOR 125 years the Massachusetts Horticultural Society has been favored 
by the generosity of its members whose patronage has made possible an 
Endowment Fund for carrying on its multitudinous activities for the promotion 
of horticulture in this Commonwealth. Furthermore, the Society has con- 
tributed greatly to the ever-increasing development of horticultural influence 
and achievement throughout the country. It is hoped that the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society will be remembered by those members who wish to 
distribute their funds for public benefaction in the fields of the arts and sciences. 
All bequests are tax-exempt. This Society enjoys an enviable reputation for 
its solid financial condition and its judicious method of handling investments. 
Since expenses for maintenance and activities are ever on the increase, addi- 
tional funds are needed to carry on and to extend the services of this Society - 
"for the advancement of horticulture." 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, 

the sum of to be used as the Board 

of Trustees may direct for the promotion of horti- 
culture in its various forms and for extending the 
activities of the Society along educational lines. 

Signed 



WAVERLY PRESS. INC.. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



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